How do you clean your daily beaters?
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Folks,
Relatively new to the world of pocket knives and was wondering how to you clean your daily beater (which will likely get the most use/abuse of your collection)? Pocket lint, dust, glue residue (if you use it to open boxes/packages), etc. I know most steels have a minimum of rust resistance, but wonder how does one clean knives w/o damaging the blade or the other mechanisms in the knife? TIA!
thumb_upJonasHeineman
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rdodev
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reswright
1666
Apr 19, 2019
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assuming you mean by beater an inexpensive stainless steel folding knife with a simple lock that one uses for dirty, hard wear jobs? not my thing any more, but i do have some concrete advice if it's yours: step one: disassemble your knife step two: reassemble it with teflon washers step 3: you're good to go: wash it under a faucet, dunk it in water. so long as you can give it a good shake and let it air dry a while it'll be fine. realistically by the time you corrode the steel or other metal with soap and water... you will long have moved onto another beater knife. That's how beater knives work. you get the consumer rush of buying a new knife much more often than you do if you try and buy tools built for a lifetime, and use them accordingly. the downside is you need to take care of your knife as much as your knife takes care of you, which somewhat defeats the purpose of using a tool in the first place.
Apr 19, 2019
Wpadget
13
Apr 7, 2019
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Hose it down, dry it then sprat it down with Remoil.
Apr 7, 2019
Bishop759
23
Mar 31, 2019
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I use Remington gun cleaner/oil. After I clean the lint and gunk off with a qtip and an old dishrag. Then I use nano oil as needed on all moving parts. It doesn’t attract dirt and dust like conventional oils. If you you your edc to cut food the products need to be different. For a knife used for food prep I recommend washing it then coating it with mineral oil.
Mar 31, 2019
14themoney
1104
Mar 30, 2019
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I pull them out of the mixer and place them in hot soapy water. What? Oh! You mean the cheap knives. It really depends upon what has been beaten on. I try to use an appropriate solvent. Mineral spirits for gooey organic stuff and most adhesives. I recently got some Flitz that does a very good job. If they are really filthy, I will take them apart, clean, and lube them in addition to tending to the blade.
Mar 30, 2019
MadAK88
0
Mar 9, 2019
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Wiha makes a nice set
Mar 9, 2019
MadAK88
0
Mar 25, 2019
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https://www.wihatools.com/torx-tools/bit-sets I have the all torx version of this. I quite like it.
Mar 25, 2019
KButdorf
30
Mar 28, 2019
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Thx madAK88
Mar 28, 2019
KButdorf
30
Mar 8, 2019
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Where can I find a good set of T bits for disassembly?
Mar 8, 2019
Infinite01
2
Mar 4, 2019
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Alcohol and compressed air.
Mar 4, 2019
14themoney
1104
Feb 28, 2019
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Alcohol, GooGone, or acetone for goop. Compressed air works well to blow them out when lung power is insufficient. If it is stainless, soap and water works. (Dry and lube it afterwards.) I very recently got some Flitz. I have taken a couple of mine apart and done the whole blade, then BlueLubed the moving parts. (Thumbup) Check out YouTube. Take what sounds good and try it. You will eventually find your groove.
Feb 28, 2019
bookworm13
601
Aug 13, 2018
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Late to the party, but I came to MD today to ask the same question.
For cleaning off the sticky gunk from cutting packing tape, I've been using odorless mineral spirits. It's not really odorless but it's less volatile than the usual stuff. I still make sure the ventilation is good when I use it.
For lubricating and rust prevention I've been using M-Pro7 gun oil.
Aug 13, 2018
detmercod
1
Jul 28, 2018
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Typically, unless the knife is fairly cheap or just plain steel, and depending on whether or not it's a cooking/eating utensil, I will use Ballistol or wd40. Both have great cleaning uses for both the metal AND g10 on knives. It isn't corrosive and is water soluble. It is quick and easy to apply and keeps blades lubricated for a long time.
Jul 28, 2018
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