Showing 1 of 8 conversations about:
connguy
17
Jun 1, 2014
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Titanium is a very strong metal, but not remotely as hard as modern steel (strength != hardness). This means it makes a very poor choice for a knife, because it can't hold an edge. If you want this type of fixed-blade, ultra-light knife, what you want is the ESEE Izula. ESEE is a fantastic, American-made brand with a forever, no-questions-asked warranty on all their blades. I highly recommend you do NOT make a poll for a titanium knife, I get the feeling most people who buy into it will come away disappointed.
Here's a link to the Izula, which I won't post for voting since it doesn't technically fit the poll requirements: http://www.eseeknives.com/izula.htm
Jun 1, 2014
Chrome
3
Jun 1, 2014
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Pending the results of the poll, I'm perfectly willing to take on a high-maintenance knife edge. I won't have to worry about rust, and I have the benefit of a nice diamond wheel sharpener at home that produces results I'm entirely pleased with.
However, for the newbie, I strongly recommend a good diamond-wheel pull-through device for routine maintenance, and something like a Spyderco Sharpmaker for more involved work.
Jun 1, 2014
fluid_motion
44
Jun 1, 2014
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Titanium can actually hold an edge longer than some traditional knife steels if it's carbarized on one side like the Daniel Fairly as the titanium wears faster than the carbarization essentially making it self-sharpening, not that the Izula isn't a great knife, i just think that titanium doesn't completely fail as a blade steel
Jun 1, 2014
HalfMoon
33
Jun 1, 2014
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I agree. I have the RAT/ESEE collection from the Izula, arrowheads to the #3, #4, #5, #6, Junglas and even the Machete. Randall's knives are awesome tools.
These are more "neat" and not a real tool, in my opinion. I also don't care for the ones with the clip in the handle, I want a sturdy handle.
Jun 1, 2014
Will
7008
Chief Product Officer
Jun 2, 2014
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How's the self sharpening work? I'm looking into these knives and that seems like an amazing feature, especially if you're looking for a survival oriented knife.
Jun 2, 2014
Synthful
17
Jun 2, 2014
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It's also quite brittle. The allure of a Ti knife isn't it's functionality, it's the weight and feel. In essence, it's a collector's knife. You could use it here and there, but mostly it will just be a talking piece.
Jun 2, 2014
Lepepwerdna
4
Jun 2, 2014
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Titanium carbide / nitride is very hard: ~9 on the Mohs scale. This is approximately equal to sapphire. Diamond is 10 for reference. This is also much harder than most steels when hardened. This is why Carbides / nitrides are used in cutting tools for working hard metals such as steel. Most knife blades will have a Rockwell hardness between 50-60, this is about equal to 3-3.5 on the Mohs scale.
When one side of the is carbidized / nitrided, the soft side of the metal is continually worn down, exposing more and more carbides, forming what is essentially micro-serrations. In this sense it is self sharpening. I'm not sure any of these knives are treated this way however, and it is not a cheap process.
Because of the "micro-serrations" it may not seem like a sharp blade if you were to just touch it, but it functions as a sharp blade when slicing. For example, these knives would work well for slicing food, but not for whittling wood.
Jun 2, 2014
fluid_motion
44
Jun 2, 2014
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exactly correct, however I looked up the Daniel Fairly titanium knife on his website and it seems that it actually is carbidized on one side
Jun 2, 2014
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