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Honeybadgers
323
Nov 15, 2020
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I do adore my zippo, have a vintage WW2 style raw brass one that has a fantastic patina. I really like natural wick lighters, but I don't smoke, and I generally just keep a lighter in my pocket for when I have a patient that does smoke and really wants a light before I drop them off at the psych hospital or something, or need to melt off a frayed nylon end or something. And I was literally refilling this once a week. I got the butane insert and noticed that it really struggled to light. Figured it out - the post that creates the ignition arc was vent far enough back that it was arcing backwards to the body and not down to the rim of one of the torches like it should. Used a flathead screwdriver (anything would work though, you could do it with a dime) to push it down just a touch and after that, every time I pushed the ignitor, it arcs down to the rim of the torch and lights with 100% reliability. And it holds onto butane well, also. Leave it for months unused and it lights right up. I do with there was a way to make the wick system last longer. Even if I still had to fill it once a month, I'd be happy. But the butane insert means I still get to have that nice clinkey toy in my pocket.
Nov 15, 2020
Kiefofpolice
147
Nov 16, 2020
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You should try the rechargeable double arc electric one. Like a little mini taser. And as for the butane inserts the best way to do it is turn the flame height down when you refill it, wait 5 minutes for it to get back to room temperature and put flame height back to mid to high, and it lights everytime after it gets back to room temp.
Nov 16, 2020
Honeybadgers
323
Nov 17, 2020
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Like I described - none of those were my issue - I have the double flame butane insert, and have a rechargeable arc lighter stick lighter, but that would be much less useful unless I was using it to light very specific things (they suck for melting the edge of frayed nylon in particular.) The problem was very specifically that the electrode itself was not bent far enough forward (it really needed a half millimeter of adjustment downward) which was causing the arc to go backwards to the body of the insert, not down to the rim of the torch. Essentially it was like having a spark plug wire that was broken internally, causing it to arc to the engine block instead of through the spark plug. Ain't gonna make fire when the spark is somewhere there ain't nothing to burn.
(Edited)
Nov 17, 2020
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