Showing 1 of 88 conversations about:
raafbloke
29
Oct 8, 2017
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G'day All, I got one of these great knives in their last Drop. I've been using and collecting knives for over 50 years and I really admire the work of Ken Onion. And I've got several CRKT knives and machetes. None of them have given me any problems until the Large Eros. Since I've had it (about5 months, I think) the blade locking mechanism has failed 3 times. The locking bar barely sits in position less than one millimetre. I've never had a problem with a product purchased through Massdrop. Could someone please let me know what to do. Do I send the knife back to Massdrop or CRKT? I don't want a refund. I'd like the knife I have to be fixed or replaced. I wanted to check first because postage from Australia back to the US is expensive. Kind regards to anyone who'd like to assist with some info. Cheers, Bill Halliwell Hobart TAS
Oct 8, 2017
beigela
8
Oct 9, 2017
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Bill - thanks for posting this.
I would like to hear back on this as well. My knife is currently unusable since it doesn't lock reliably. It's actually rather difficult to lock, and I've barely carried it or used it at all. It currently sits under a stack of mail being useless, so I would love to do anything with it (get it fixed, replaced, or refunded).
-Alex
Oct 9, 2017
raafbloke
29
Oct 9, 2017
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G'day Alex, Thanks for your comments. Had I known sooner about the second drop of this particular model I would have counseled people to perhaps give it a miss till the locking assembly is fixed. I have CC'd my comments on here back to MassDrop and they are looking into it. Failing that I'll go directly to CRKT, afterall the ultimate responsibility sits wit them. I'll let you all know how it goes. I'd also be pleased to know how many other Dropsters had this problem; it would be good back up info for my talks with CRKT. Cheers, Bill Halliwell
Oct 9, 2017
s4mpson
11
Oct 11, 2017
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Disassemble it and carefully, CAREFULLY, bend the lock bar towards the center of the knife. You really only need the lockbar to ultimately be moved 1-2mm when you're done adjusting it. That's basically it to adjusting the lockup.
What you have is 'early' lockup and is generally considered a preferable trait. You should see some higher end production pieces, especially russian made and hinderers, the lockup is so early that people are afraid to touch the knife. For the most part the early lockup is just as strong as a 50% lockup regardless of how it looks. There is a limit of course and it's obvious if you can just push the blade and have it jump off the lock.
The lock geometry is more critical than the amount of contact between lockbag and tang. This is outlined by Bob Terzuola in his book: The Tactical Folding Knife. The three points of contact are the stop pin, pivot pin and the contact point between tang and lockface. The shape it creates is a triangle, the strongest shape for load bearing. The tolerances are very tight and critical for an effective lock. The book says the lockface angle should be between 7.5 and 8.5 degrees, more than 10 and it will start slipping off, less than 5 degrees and the lock will jam. Then there is the radius of the lock face, which shouldn't exceed 10 degrees or apparently the lock will start to slip-which has been called lock rolling. Any knife manufacturer not getting sued into oblivion should know all about it.
All locks and the geometries are different and the makers decide the best application for each design. A knife with great lock geometry that locks up solid at 5-10% is better than a poorly made lock with geometries outside acceptable range that locks up at 85%. I have knives that lock up bank vault solid at 5% that I beat the hell out of them. You would probably look at it and think there is no way it's safe, but it is.
Oct 11, 2017
raafbloke
29
Jan 2, 2018
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Thank you all for your comments and assistance. I've got partially disabled hands so it's not my thing to go manually fiddling with a mechanism I'm not familiar with, besides I don't think it is the task of the buyer to correct the faults of the supplier. With small US knife companies I've had nothing but outstanding customer service but I don't have a good track record with the large companies. I sent a copy of my post here directly to Massdrop and they most kindly granted me a ONE-OFF refund even though my transaction was long past the refund point. I really appreciate their kind gesture, I'd just rather have a good, reliable knife that is designed by a genius in the industry and one who, I'm sure, would be appalled by the thought that the manufacturer is not keeping up with quality control. I would gladly give back the refund for a reliable, safe knife as it is such a great design and fits a task I have for it perfectly. I'm too old to waste months wrangling with the manufacturer. Sadly, as far as I know there is no one in Tasmania I could send this knife to for a reliable repair. Sending even small knives back and forth to the US has now become even more expensive. Anyway, once again, thank you all for helpful input! Happy New Year from Hobart Tasmania! Cheers, BH
Jan 2, 2018
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