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lolipopping
13
Feb 20, 2015
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How many pages can I write with one refill?
Feb 20, 2015
AABCDS
337
Feb 20, 2015
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Three.
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Feb 20, 2015
AlexGk
143
Feb 20, 2015
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Hard to tell, it depends on several factors. First, nib size: with the same amount of ink you can write more words with an EF than an F, then more words with an F than a M etc. Second, closely connected with the first one, your handwriting. If you write 3mm wide letters you'll probably take more time to fill a page than someone who writes 10mm high letters. At the same time consider that usually a larger handwriting requires a broader nib not to look "strange", which clearly requires more ink. Third, the way you refill your pen. Cartridges last longer than a full Z24/Z26 converter, but the second option gives you the ability to use different inks and refill even when the converter isn't totally empty, to avoid it leaving you without ink in the moments of need. Without a personal test is almost impossible to tell how long a refill would last you. I can just give you my personal experience: with an EF nib, a converter full of Aurora Black (which is particularly fluid), and a fairly small handwriting (more or less 3mm letters, with 25~30 lines per sheet), I manage to get through 9 hours of non-stop university note-taking (roughly 8 A4 pages, written on both sides).
Feb 20, 2015
AccioLamy
1
Feb 20, 2015
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Depends on quite a few things; Converter fill or cartridge fill, what nib size, what ink you're using, your writing speed, your writing size, the absorbency of your paper.
Cartridges hold a larger volume of ink than the refillable Z-24 Lamy converter. However the converter allows you to easily fill from a bottle of ink.
Lamy nibs seem to run a bit larger than usual, so a fine point makes a decently bold line on common or mid-range paper. If you want a finer line I would point you towards a Pilot Metropolitan Fine as Japanese pens run a bit smaller than normal.
Ink has a lot to do with your line thickness and how much you can write on one refill. Using a F Nib with a Lamy cartridge, I wrote about ten pages on poor quality college ruled lose-leaf. Every ink behaves differently in every pen, so you would have to experiment a bit to find something perfect for you. I hear good things about Noodlers X-Feather and the Pilot Iroshizuku line, though they are a bit pricey.
The faster and smaller you write the less ink you put down for each letter, simple really.
Paper quality has a lot to do with it too. HP #32 Inkjet paper works well with fountain pens. Rhodia pads are also good.
Feb 20, 2015
GonzoTGreat
756
Feb 20, 2015
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Not sure how many pages, but the z24 converter seems to hold about 1ml. of ink.
Feb 20, 2015
AlexGk
143
Feb 21, 2015
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Thanks for your add-on about paper! I forgot that part as I totally switched to Rhodia for everything right after I bought my first fountain pen! I might add just a couple of things: the Iroshizuku are probably the best fountain pen inks in existence, in my opinion only Aurora gets close (or even better, comparing its black to Pilot's Take-Sumi), but it makes only black and blue inks. The issue with the inks of these two brands is that they are addressed to enthusiast fountain pens users, aka people that use Rhodia/Clairefontaine and nothing else, as they're both incredibly fluid. Believe me when I say that those two brands' inks will feather and even bleed through a lot on poor paper. When, back in the day, I used my Al-Star EF for note-taking, notes added on low quality copy paper the professors gave us ended up being twice as large as the one on my Rhodia pad. The fluidity of these inks lubricates the nib and makes it write more smoothly, but dry time on high end paper is higher while feathering, bleed-through and absorption are high on poorer paper. My 2-cents suggestion? If you want to keep using low quality paper, get the smallest nib possible (EF in this case), and Noodler's X-Feather, or any other not too fluid ink (there are several discussions on fountain pen forums about those). If you want to step up a bit, get some higher quality paper, like (in descending quality order, just IMHO clearly): Rhodia/Clairefontaine (same brand), Oxford (Optik Paper only), something from Leuchtturm1917, good A4 paper, like HP 32. I didn't mention the famous Moleskine because I've had mixed experience with its products: sometimes as good as Oxford, sometimes so much bleed through that I basically wrote everything twice, one copy on the first page, the other on the one right below. Hope I've been at least a little useful to you. p.s.: @AccioLamy, I was answering to you but my message was for everyone, ok?
Feb 21, 2015
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