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reswright
1137
Sep 16, 2019
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The lines are nice. I like the pivot collar, looks nice in the spare design. Bohler Uddeholm M390 is often regarded as the first among equals when it comes to super steels -- although CPM-20CV and CTS-204P are just about impossible to tell apart chemically, and for that matter in any other way as well, M390 has a habit of turning out just a fraction of a hair better on some tests that are designed to simulate, like, years of wear. That may boil down to a slightly better PM technology producing a slightly purer and more even alloy matrix, or it might just be conventional wisdom at work and there's really no meaningful difference between the three steels. Whatever the difference, M390's good stuff. Slip joints aren't really my thing, or I might pick one up. Spent too long pissing around with them as a kid to be all that nostalgic for them now, and once you get used to using locked blades, it's hard to go back. It's not a quality issue -- the truth is if people use them purposefully they're just fine, and they're less legally controlled and more socially acceptable than pulling out some bigass lockback, and a lot of people are making slipjoints again so clearly there's a demand. Just not from me.
Sep 16, 2019
anonomous
510
Sep 16, 2019
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Except it all varies on the heat treatment. And this class of steel is mostly done poorly. It is especially poorly done on the Italian knives where the focus is on corrosion resistance. So don't expect performance from fox, viper, mkm etc. In a test lionsteel did, m390 did 600 cuts and there sleipner did 1200. That's how bad they do this steel. Then 2nd parties have confirmed that the Italian m390 is a very poor performance steel due to there heat treatment process. So value of these Italian brands is not good. They have nice looks but that is all. But also most manufacturers of M390, 204p and 20cv struggle to also surpass s30v in edge retention. Because they want your money.
Sep 16, 2019
reswright
1137
Sep 16, 2019
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Fair points. Heat and other treatments definitely matter, and Italian industry is better known for design than consistency. And we get so far into discussing the differences in individual steels that sometimes we forget that the average person can't even tell most of them apart, and the people who can, need some time to do so. OTOH, Sleipner is kinda LionSteel's thing, so I'd also expect a little hype and inflation from them about it.
Sep 16, 2019
reswright
1137
Sep 17, 2019
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Sleipner compared to D2 : more moly, less chromium and vanadium. There's no one set rule for what happens when you increase or decrease an alloying material, but generally speaking with less chromium there will be more hard carbides forming, and with less vanadium it might be easier to work. There's extra molybdenum, which at these concentrations can form large double carbides that contribute to toughness. From zknives: Sleipner(Bohler-Uddeholm) - Uddeholm proprietary Cold work tool steel. Modification of the classic AISI D2 tool steel. Sleipner has improved toughness compared to D2, good wear and chipping resistance. Attainable hardness 60-64HRC. Used by Lionsteel in their folders. According to Lionsteel had better edge holding compared to Uddeholm M390 steel, although no information provided on test details. Link: http://zknives.com/knives/steels/steelgraph.php?nm=Sleipner
Sep 17, 2019
anonomous
510
Sep 17, 2019
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https://www.bladeforums.com/threads/lionsteel-steels.1168429/ It's cause they heat treatment the m390 for corrosion resistance and don't do a secondary hardening. Check out the cut tests on the Italian m390 knives. It's pretty sad. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCI_ZXbN06A7W937hKKnUfqQ Sleipner does pretty well in the tests that supersteel Steve did. So does elmax. There m390 could do alot better but because they burn the edges grinding them dry and do a sub optimal heat treatment it comes out just bad.
(Edited)
Sep 17, 2019
Aumank33
3
Nov 15, 2019
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I hope you know that this Brad zinker FR is not a slip joint but it has a titanium frame lock which could arguably be considered a liner lock but ultimately yes it is a locking blade...
Nov 15, 2019
reswright
1137
Nov 15, 2019
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...what Brad Zinker FR? The comment's about a Lucas Burnley MKM slipjoint. At least, that's what I'm seeing. Says 'slip joint' all over the description and even mentions that it's got that 90/180 thing going on. I have the certain idea that one of us is confused about something, but I'm not sure which of us it is.
Nov 15, 2019
Aumank33
3
Nov 25, 2019
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Ahh yes, somehow I think my comment was posted in the wrong location as I was looking at the Zinker FR in S35VN not sure how it posted here
Nov 25, 2019
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