Showing 1 of 42 conversations about:
AtCal
24
Apr 10, 2017
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180 to 320 grit?????  I would use this to sharpen a yard axe not a high quality blade.  Unless it is as dull as a spoon and you found it in your Grandfather's old desk don't touch a fine blade with this.... will take way, way too much metal off.  That said, you have a dull axe this is probably just fine....
Note to the massdrop corp. buyers.... This with a 600/1000/3000 (or thereabouts) would be a definite purchase if you own nice kitchen or other blades similar to some of the ones that have dropped previously.
Apr 10, 2017
Domanic
63
Apr 10, 2017
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I'm hoping that they just forgot to put an extra zero on the end of those numbers otherwise this drop is pointless.
Apr 10, 2017
AtCal
24
Apr 11, 2017
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No way am I ever that lucky, so I would say it probably is what it is unfortunately.
Seriously, if you have an old, blunt axe the 10" version is prob not a bad deal.... :)
Apr 11, 2017
OjibwayBob
19
Apr 11, 2017
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Thanks for the heads up. I love my knives but I am new to the honing and sharpening game. I was about to buy this until you noted that above. I do not want to strip too much off of the blades.
Apr 11, 2017
AtCal
24
Apr 12, 2017
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Troll YouTube for some knife sharpening how-to.... Actually some very good instructional videos on there(some weird types too as always). With really nice blades some of the stones can go all the way up to 8k-10k grit if you really want to get a polish on it. That is a bit OCD (and expensive) for me, but if you have a good blade that just need to be occasionally maintained I would look for something in the 800-1000 range and then add finer (and coarser) grits as you get more anal about it.  They can get expensive for good ones. Also, you may want to decide if you are going to go with water stones or oil... both work, just less of a hassle having all of one type or the other. 
Alternately, if you have a big camp blade you find gets whacked around a lot you could use a lower grit to start with, but I've never found it really necessary.
Also, this may vary by the type of steel in the blade, but generally holds true... just takes more effort/longer for some steels.
Apr 12, 2017
OjibwayBob
19
Apr 12, 2017
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Thanks, will do. I recently joined a blades forum so I am going to do a lot of reading on it as well.
Apr 12, 2017
Orizon
1
Apr 12, 2017
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Exactly. I wouldn't even use 180 on my axe... I think your 600/1000/3000 suggestion is perfect.
Apr 12, 2017
TRexSr
132
May 26, 2017
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I do so hope we get clarification on the grit because I myself need some good stones for my burgeoning blade collection and I like what I see here but don't want to take a lawn mower to my knives. Lol
May 26, 2017
beaconterraone
83
May 27, 2017
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I can't find any definitive answers, but what I did find seems to indicate the grits listed are correct.
Seems these are best for low-end and/or carbon steel only. No S30V+ steels. Or even AUS-8.
May 27, 2017
TRexSr
132
May 28, 2017
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At best! Lol
May 28, 2017
CyrusGuybrush
19
May 30, 2017
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I have no idea what low quality steel or carbon steel I would use this on not anything I would dream of owning. btw I genraly consider the best grit combo to be 200 or so for repairs and mods, 1000 for main sharpening and a 4000-6000 for polishing . 6000+ is also quite a nice addition if a little unnnecacary.
May 30, 2017
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