Showing 1 of 11 conversations about:
Thor-tron
17
Aug 24, 2018
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I agree that this wouldn't be considered "ultralight" by definition but not too many double walled 2p tents are. There are some but they are mostly not for the budget minded. There are many single walled and tarp options for very cheap and even some double wall 1p tents that would be under 3 lbs for affordable prices but I think some are looking to keep the space and comfort that this tent offers. While not "ultralight" I think it's not a bad lightweight option for some who can use the savings and put towards much lighter sleeping bags, pads, or backpacks and still keep base weight at 10lbs or under. That said this is not exactly "cheap" for some either and there are tents (to answer the last comment) that are similar in weight design and specs out there in 100 to 160 price range. Examples: Hyke n Byke, Outdoor vitals, Paria outdoors, Naturehike, Meir Sports. Just be cautious, do your homework. I have experience with Paria Outdoors Bryce 2p tent and I was impressed with it. I haven't found any double walled 2p tents under 3lbs in the 100 range. Anyway thanks for the variety Massdrop and happy hiking all.
Aug 24, 2018
Stepbystep
548
Aug 24, 2018
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"Ultralight" - by definition - is total base weight, not the weight of individual items...within reason. Unless you are using a 2P as a solo tent, there is no reason either of these can't fairly easily fit into an ultralight base weight (they are well under 2lbs per person). If you look at all of the materials used there is every reason to consider these tents as "ultralight" using the same non-base-weight logic, but they are full featured poled double wall tents so of course they weigh more than single wall and/or trekking pole supported designs. Sure, you can go a lot lighter if you want, tons of options, but let's not muddy the definition of ultralight, eh? As for the "cheap" brands, they've all enjoyed trickle down benefits of both materials and (usually) better construction from factories that are more skilled than in the past, but still have to watch out and examine carefully. Lots of examples of material or construction failures no matter the weight, which just comes down to what is available to meet lower price points (very cheap thread is most common and most use pretty low quality fabrics (strength) too). Sometimes this is just fine for most users and sometimes it means that you'd better limit the use to fair weather with low winds or just brief rains and be prepared to fix some stitching or do patches, etc. Two things experienced backpackers normally won't skimp on are shelter and sleeping bag/quilt since you need both of those to be dependable and they are critical gear where failure can be real trouble at times.
Aug 24, 2018
Thor-tron
17
Aug 24, 2018
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Yes I agree with all your points. I was trying to express what you have said but I think you put it better. There were previous comments that disagreed with this tent being in ultralight I felt that wasn't entirely true. This tent and the ones I mentioned will work in a ultralight set up but you must test and tune any tent you buy no matter the price to be sure it will work in your conditions. Also absolutely when purchasing any type of gear know where you will be using them and test completely and be sure the items will hold up and keep you safe.
Aug 24, 2018
overhere
41
Aug 25, 2018
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This tent packs huge. Ultralight is important but so is pack size. Hyke n Byke is 4 pounds. It packs large. Outdoor vitals is 5 pounds and packs large, Paria outdoors is 5 pounds, Meir sends you to Academy, Mier gives options for "equitment" (without spelling correction) and no tents are shown. Not sure how you keep the base weight under 10 lbs while carrying nearly 4-5 pounds in just a tent. There is also the pack (if its going to hold food should weigh at least 3 pounds), the sleeping bag (2 pounds minimum), stove, pot, water filter, water holding container, spare socks, maps or phone, headlamp, bug spray, toothbrush, pack rain cover, rain coat, beanie, gloves? ursak or BV, seriously, no way that is under 10 pounds. Spend an extra $70 and get a Nemo Hornet when it is on sale (twice a yr). Packs small, weighs less.
Aug 25, 2018
Thor-tron
17
Aug 25, 2018
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Thanks for the oberservations but I don't think the main point of my comment is coming across. I feel that the tent being offered can be used in a ultralight setup even as a solo tent. The Paria outdoors Bryce 2p fits well in my pack and is just under 4lbs minus footprint and so far holding up well in my use. On a budget I missed the ultralight by 2.5lbs and that was spending 300 for 20 degree quilt that is 24oz. If I bought a arc haul, thermarest neroair, and more lightweight clothing I think I could meet that 10lbs. That said I agree the other tents may not be best option and would most likely need 2 people to share the tent to make that 10lbs mark. The tent being offered is of a decent weight and price that I think would work. The tent was a hard purchase for me because I'm on a budget and I needed the space for my son to go with sometimes and honestly I mostly likely will go lighter if the holiday prices are right on a better tent as you suggested. I thank you again for your input because I feel it's good for people in the market for a tent or anything to hear many sides of the subject and I feel your comments are just and explained well. Good luck to you and anyone (ecspecially those on a budget) seeking ultralight. Balancing budget, saftey, and comfort is difficult and hopefully these discussions help someone including myself. Peace
Aug 25, 2018
overhere
41
Aug 25, 2018
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Sorry, I did not look up the Paria Bryce 2p because it is out of stock and can't be ordered. I looked up another Paria Bryce. Glad you got it while it was available and glad that using it without a footprint is working for you and the longevity of a tent without a footprint justifies the somewhat lower price.
Aug 25, 2018
overhere
41
Aug 25, 2018
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I'm a solo hiker so no option of sharing the load. I like 2P tents for gear. For me, there is a yuk factor in having the pack in the vestibule (scorpions, ticks, mice). Mice are troublesome in Grand Canyon and Patagonia! One option for one on a budget is the marmot Tungston 1P. It packs larger than the ultralight so you carry it outside the pack, but it's roomy and for around $140 (frequent sale price). All my gear fits inside. Its more durable fabric than other ultralights so might could use without the footprint (BTW the footprint comes with it) to save weight. And you could trade out the stakes to save more weight. If I'm going to a rocky area with not heavy winds, I go light on stakes...using rocks. Just a suggestion for those on a budget.
Aug 25, 2018
Cardamomtea
532
Aug 27, 2018
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@overhere You are right on the money. And the Nemo Hornet 2p is on sale right now for $275 at REI! So only $45 extra.
My Nemo Hornet weighs 2lb for tent + rainfly + poles. I use it for me & two dogs. Two people do fit, but would be tight just like this Sierra Designs one here. I was on the fence between the Nemo Hornet 2p & Zpacks Duplex, but decided to save money and get the Nemo.
Nemo says you need 6 stakes, but you really only need 2 to 4. Two in order to stake out the rainfly. Two more to stake out rear corners OR you can do what I do sometimes and that's use a trekking pole outside the tent and attach the tent to that instead of stakes (it becomes a freestanding tent at that point, one which you can lift in air and reposition). The last two stakes, for the front of the tent only serve to anchor tent to ground.
Did I mention I loooove my Nemo Hornet?? :-D
Aug 27, 2018
overhere
41
Aug 27, 2018
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I love the Hornet 2P as well. I do use 6 stakes and can not envision how you use hiking poles instead of two of the stakes, but would love a picture to clarify. After using it 60+ nights, I'm thinking of getting another one due to the sale price.
Aug 27, 2018
RockyMountains
471
Aug 30, 2018
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> Mice are troublesome in Grand Canyon and Patagonia!
I'm curious, where did you encounter mice in Patagonia? I spent 3 months cycling there a whiles back and we never encountered that problem.
Aug 30, 2018
Cardamomtea
532
Sep 2, 2018
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@overhere Sorry for the tardy reply! I set up my tent inside with the trekking pole & took some photos for you. Definitely make sure the trekking pole is on the outside of the center tent pole. You can wrap the corner stake ties around the trekking pole multiple times to get it the way you want. Hope this helps!
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Sep 2, 2018
Cardamomtea
532
Sep 2, 2018
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And some more photos, this time with the rainfly on, and a closeup of a twistie-tie looped through the fabric loop next to the tent pole grommet, wrapped around the trekking pole. This keeps the trekking pole from riding up (which causes the fly to be less than taut).
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Sep 2, 2018
overhere
41
Sep 2, 2018
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Sorry about the delay.... out of town. The W trail at Torres Del Paine National park on the Chile side of Patagonia . Mice were so bad, we rented tents to avoid chewed holes. Frequently woken by scampering and chewing. Could kick that part of the tent to have them scurry away only to start again in a few minutes.
Sep 2, 2018
overhere
41
Sep 2, 2018
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Cool idea! Thanks!
Sep 2, 2018
overhere
41
Sep 2, 2018
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Thank you for this. Will use it in the future.
Sep 2, 2018
RockyMountains
471
Sep 3, 2018
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Huh, weird. I did the full circuit a good two decades back now (wow, I am getting old) and we didn't encounter (or hear complaints of) a single rodent encounter. This was a December, so perhaps they are seasonal or weather dependent- it was cold enough that it was snowing at the time.
Sep 3, 2018
overhere
41
Sep 3, 2018
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We went in March. 3 years ago.
Sep 3, 2018
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