breadaggression
3
Oct 25, 2017
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So I would say I am a casual coffee drinker. I drink coffee every morning and know the basic differences between drip, pour over, french press, etc. and also now that freshly ground beans make all the difference. So a few questions: For someone just getting into 'nice' coffee, but brewing moderately large quantities (8 cups) in the morning, what kind of grinder would be best? I've heard murmurings of burr grinders and their superiority, but what makes them so much better? If I still want to use a drip brewer, would a nice grinder even matter?
Oct 25, 2017
mdberm
14
Oct 25, 2017
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I'm no pro, but I have certainly found that a nice grinder makes a big difference - even with drip coffee. A burr grinder grinds more evenly, so all of the grinds are the same size and texture. That allows the full flavor of the beans to come out, or at least as much of the flavor that your brewing method will allow. In my experience, this is particularly the case with a finer grind, but still makes a difference with a coarser one (just not as much). Also, electric burr grinder tend to be quite expensive, but it is possible to find good manual ones for very reasonable prices. Hope this helps!
Oct 25, 2017
abela
512
Oct 25, 2017
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A burr grinder makes a huge difference. It grinds, verses tears. It also results in a lower heating of the bean during the process.
Another factor to remember is that if you are going to be buying mid to high end coffee beans and you use a cloth/paper filter, you are just throwing your money away, because at some point it all comes down to the oils contained in the beans and by using a filter you are preventing the oil from getting into your cup.
Oct 25, 2017
douglas882
3
Oct 25, 2017
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A burr grinder will be a great addition to your coffee making. The grind is consistent and can be adjusted to your liking. The Baratza Encore grinder is a good one to consider. Good luck and have fun!
Oct 25, 2017
FancyRedFox
94
Oct 25, 2017
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Having a burr grinder is super important, and always the 1st step (second to quality coffee) that I recommend people take to improve their cup.
I would argue though that filtration is entirely a matter of preference. How much of the coffee's oils make it into the cup has a direct correlation on the body of your coffee. Some people really love heavy bodied coffee, (eg. French Press) while some prefer a high level of clarity. (eg Chemex). I'd say this is probably the most important factor when choosing a brew method.
Oct 25, 2017
AngryAccountant
271
Oct 25, 2017
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So everyone's talking about burr grinders and such, without a specific recommendation! I've got a Cuisinart DBM-8, perfect for making a larger quantity as most of the electrics are, but it's cost is killer, running about $40. This is your entry level electric burr grinder. Get it and be happy.
In the Sub $100 price class, take a look at the Capresso 560 Infinity Burr Grinder at $86.
Next up in price class is the Baratza Encore for $130 which I'm thinking might be overkill for 99% of buyers.
Beyond that the sky's the limit on what you want to spend. One of the three I mentioned is probably your best bet though.
Oct 25, 2017
abela
512
Oct 25, 2017
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Oct 25, 2017
dvorcol
4817
Oct 25, 2017
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I second @AngryAccountant 's recommendation of the Capresso 560. I have been using one for over 10 years. It is still going strong, and I am very happy with the consistency of the grind and its noticeable improvement over blade grinding. You could say it has cost me less than $10 per year!
Oct 25, 2017
femmeartis
10
Oct 26, 2017
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after reading tons of reviews from test sites, I bought the Capresso 560.01 Infinity Conical Burr Grinder, it’s my first grinder so nothing to compare to but it’s a great size for home, easy to use and makes such a difference for the flavor!
Oct 26, 2017
Dr.McCoy
344
Oct 26, 2017
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YES.
The grinder matters more than the device, generally speaking. Burr grinders are better than blade grinders because of consistency. If you wanna just get something that'll cover all your bases (sans espresso) get a Baratza Virtuoso or Lido 2. If you just wanna dip your toe in the water get a Hario Skerton (with OE mod) or Kuissential Evengrind.
Oct 26, 2017
UnixRonin
85
Oct 26, 2017
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I second the KitchenAid ProLine recommendation. I bought one to replace a Gaggia burr grinder that I was sick and tired of completely stripping down and reassembling — a fiddly and time-consuming process — every time it clogged up with fines to the point that it wouldn't grind any more, and have never regretted it. Three key points in the KitchenAid's favor: 1. It is almost immune to clogging up with fines, because it is the only burr grinder I have so far found with vertical burrs, meaning ground coffee exits the grind chamber straight down instead of having to make a 90° turn to go out the side. 2. GLASS, not plastic, input and output hoppers mean no static charge build-up in the output hopper, so your grounds pour out cleanly with just a light tap on the bottom of the glass. 3. Not only does KitchenAid EXPECT you to service and adjust it, the user guide includes exact detailed instructions on how to calibrate it for a proper espresso grind, and it'll handle any grind from Turkish to French press.
(It also doesn't hurt that, like KitchenAid mixers, it's engineered to survive the apocalypse.)
Oct 26, 2017
UnixRonin
85
Oct 26, 2017
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Blade "grinders" don't grind the beans; they smash them.
Oct 26, 2017
Rathmas925
1
Oct 26, 2017
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Fancy Red Fox has a great point with regards to filters. While a paper filter may limit the amount of body in your cup (lipids in your coffee that give it mouthfeel) they can highlight acidity which gives coffee it's bright and juicy nuances. It really depends on what you like! If you are wanting a heavy bodied coffee then I suggest purchasing a lower grown softer bean like a Sumatra or Brazil. If you want something with a lot of acidity and fruity notes then I would suggest going with an African coffee.
Also, reiterating what FancyRedFox said with regards to the grinder. I can't speak highly enough of the value that a conical grinder can bring to your coffee game. If you are just starting out then I would say the Barazta encore is your best bet!
Hope this helps!
Oct 26, 2017
djfluffkins
130
Oct 26, 2017
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the ability to level up the game when you chose to is probably the biggest benefit. I'd recommend this one, the Baratza Sette 30: https://www.seattlecoffeegear.com/baratza-sette-30-grinder
The way the burr mechanism is designed will speed up the grind process and the precision and consistency is pretty good even without micro-adjustments.
The short answer about does it matter for a drip brewer, yes it does matter, but probably not as much as the quality of the beans you put in it. That being said, aiming for consistency is probably the first step to better coffee.
Oct 26, 2017
Geogaia
0
Oct 27, 2017
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I got a doserless Rancilio Rocky grinder used off eBay ten years ago and never once regretted it. I originally got it to go with a used semi-auto espresso machine, but fresh, burr-ground pour-over coffee was so delicious I rarely bothered with espresso. It’s very big and maybe too much for the job but the results are worth it. The GF always wants to get rid of my gear for counter space but not the Rocky—she cant drink $BUX anymore.
Oct 27, 2017
Thriftyredhead
7
Oct 27, 2017
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We use the KitchenAid Pro Burr Grinder as well. Love it's performance!
Oct 27, 2017
jkiemele
222
Nov 3, 2017
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Just chiming in to reiterate that a nice grinder does make a difference....the biggest difference I have noticed. I was skeptical before getting one, but now I don't know what I'd do without my Baratza Virtuoso. It grinds consistently and is fairly quick at grinding.
Nov 3, 2017
dvorcol
4817
Nov 3, 2017
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You could take one more step up and sift your grounds to get closer to the precise grind size you want. For example, use a Kruve Coffee Sifter set. On the first sorting, you pick a sifter screen sized to keep out all the pieces that are too large. The ones that fall thru contain the size you are looking for & smaller. So you use a finer sifter screen to sort those again, and all the pieces that are too small fall thru. What remains on top is what you're looking for.
Nov 3, 2017
dvorcol
4817
Nov 3, 2017
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The better your grinder (used before sifting), the less scrap will be left over after sifting. You could use the too-small and too-large pieces to make two cups and taste the results to learn what you left out when sifting.
Nov 3, 2017
jkiemele
222
Nov 3, 2017
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I've never felt the need to sift my grounds. I do understand that the grind size differences will change the overall end result, but when I am making coffee still half asleep in the morning, I'm fine with what my Baratza does. I am very pleased with the consistency of size it produces. Maybe someday I'll look into a Kruve set and play around with it.
Nov 3, 2017
dvorcol
4817
Nov 3, 2017
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Me too. But some are into sifting, so I'm just sayin'.
Nov 3, 2017
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