DumbDumb27
13
Nov 1, 2017
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So I drank 3 in 1 coffee for my whole life till now,it's not that I want to be annoying but I was wondering if I were to make something decent where should I start?😅
Nov 1, 2017
wredan
4
Nov 1, 2017
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It depends on how recently you've made the switch. If you've only recently started trying coffee beyond instant powders, you might want to begin at a nearby coffee shop. It can be a national chain like Starbucks or it can be a local company although a local one may be better. I say that because small local shops tend to have more options for preparation method.
The first thing you'll want to figure out is what kind of roast you generally enjoy. Broadly speaking, there are three levels of roast: Light, Medium, and Dark. Light roasts tend to be more floral or fruity. Coffee connoisseurs will also tend to ramble about how they can taste the terroir ("the earth," refers to differences in taste based on where the coffee is from). Dark roasts tend to be more focused on the flavors brought about by roasting like smoke or dark chocolate. Medium roasts are a middle ground that balances the two. You'll lose some of the delicate flavors of light roasts but gain roasting notes in return. One of my local roasters has a chart to show this for their coffees, and it also shows the regional "terroir" variations (http://compasscoffee.com/our-coffee).
The second thing you'll want to figure out is what preparation method you like the best. This is where local shops will be particularly helpful. In addition to the standard drip machine that's probably sitting in your office break room, there are pour over, french press, aeropress, american press, and espresso to name just a few. Each method will lend the coffee different characteristics. Most of these can be purchased for a minimal expense save an espresso machine. Alternatively, you can find some very good videos on YouTube which break down the different options. For example, this video breaks down the american, french, and aeropress methods and the coffees they produce (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F3eqvhUmpKQ).
Beyond this, it's up to you. Many people swear by grinding their own beans. It does tend to give you better coffee, but I've found that it's not strictly necessary. It's also yet another thing you have to buy and clean. As long as you keep your coffee decently sealed and you cycle through it quickly enough, you can get great coffee that's pre-ground. This is especially true if you've got a local company where you can get it freshly ground. Water temperature is also a thing some people have strong opinions on. They'll insist that the water be exactly a certain temperature. Personally, the one thing I would recommend beyond good beans and a good brewing setup is a decent coffee can. Preferably it'll have a gas release in the lid.


Currently I make my coffee in either a french press or a cold brew extractor. I like the cold brew method because I can make almost a week's worth of coffee in one go for a minimal amount of work. It takes maybe 20-30 minutes for me to grind the beans needed (I use a hand grinder) and add the water. Then I wait 12-24 hours before pulling the grounds out which leaves about 1.5L of cold brew concentrate of varying strength. Cut that 1:1 with milk, add a little sugar, and you've got about 6 16oz servings of cold brew although I usually store it as the coffee concentrate alone and mix it with milk in my mug as needed. I've found that this method works well with either medium or dark roast coffee. When I have the time or I want hot coffee, I find the french press is only slightly more involved than a standard automatic drip machine, but it produces better coffee in my opinion. Use a little water to heat up and clean the press if you want, and then cast it out. After you add you grounds and hot water, most french press instructions will tell you to wait 4-5 minutes at which point you'll need to remove the lid and break the crust and remove the foam from the top. The instructions will then usually have you wait another 4-5 minutes before slowly pressing the plunger. I've found that light and medium roasts work well in a french press although dark roasts will do in a pinch.
Nov 1, 2017
Dr.McCoy
344
Nov 1, 2017
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Replying to say wredan's advice is solid.
Nov 1, 2017
DumbDumb27
13
Nov 4, 2017
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Thanks a lot
Nov 4, 2017
DumbDumb27
13
Nov 4, 2017
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Yeah I'm thankful to it😁
Nov 4, 2017
Fox_Scoulder
4
Nov 6, 2017
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Wredan’s advice is solid as can be. my prefernce & recommendation would be to look for the independent or third wave coffee shops first. The methods provided will be in wider ranges with their being more familiarity with the beans, roasters, & methods. Jumping to a Starbucks or whichever large chain coffee shop will have a much more traditional approach to coffee, which to me translates 9/10 to be burnt or over roasted beans with a pour tracking of brewing times.
Nov 6, 2017
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