Newbie needs help: How can I set up an awesome sewing space?
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I am brand new to sewing. In fact, I'm so new that I don't even know how to use my new Janome properly yet. Before I begin this latest crafting adventure, I need to set up my machine somewhere.
I'm going to be converting my side of our home office into a sewing space, and would love to hear some feedback on any tips and tricks you have for organizing your supplies, notions, and other tools!
  • How do you have your sewing space set up?
  • What are some of the most important things you need handy?
  • What are you favorite storage solutions?
  • What are some things you wish you knew starting out?
Photos are welcomed and encouraged! Please help this newbie get started on a good foot. :)

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thumb_upLadywatkins59, Susie L, and 12 others
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Liz
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KLM1
0
Jul 22, 2019
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I get a lot of stuff from IKEA, like storage bins with lids for fabric that I stash in an existing closet, tables and drawer cabinets. My two Janomes sit on top of Linnmon table top with Adils legs. I set them up on an "L" configuration so one table is perpindicular to the wall. I set my bigger Janome with a Sew Steady table facing the wall so I can free motion quilt and have the wall to keep the quilt from dragging off the table, and use the other table to the left to support the quilt. I set up my cutting mat on the end of the"peninsula" so I can walk around three sides to do my cutting. I set up my smaller Janome on the outside of the "L" next to the wall so I could do patchwork without changing my sewing machine feet all the time. Besides, my little one is a mechanical straight stitch machine and so it has a solid no fuss mechanism to do patchwork with! I like to do applique work so I made my own ironing surface using a 2'x4' mason board covered with batting and canvas duct taped to the back side. I place this on another Linnmon table facing a window so I can sit and fuse or Appliquick in good sunlight, or use the Ott table lamp at night.
Jul 22, 2019
JudiP
0
Jul 18, 2019
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If you have a large enough space, I would suggest looking at IKEA Billy Bookcases with glass doors. Like another reader, I used comic book cardboard to wrap my fabric around like mini bolts. I wanted a cutting table with lots of storage so I took two 36” IKEA kitchen cabinets and two 18” ones, put them together, added casters on the bottom and a plywood top and voila, a cutting table with lots of storage! I also got some IKEA wardrobes to store bins of fabric and other things!! I attached photos below.
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Jul 18, 2019
junequilt
3
Jun 14, 2019
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If you have a window in your space, place your sewing table perpendicular to it. This may seem awkward, but there is nothing like having natural light at the left -- and most active -- edge of your machine, where all of your actual sewing will take place. You'll have no shadows as long as the daylight lasts, thus no need to supplement lighting! You can then set up a trimming/pressing surface to your right (a small table, perhaps, with a combined cutting and pressing mat and mini-iron on top) and just swivel in your chair from sewing to pressing.
Jun 14, 2019
PamRB
2
Jun 12, 2019
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Can not emphasize enough on a sturdy cutting table. The folding type picnic tables eventually start to sag in the middle making all your cuts off. Yes I found out the hard way. I use an old wood dinning table with leaves so I can extend for larger projects. I am looking on how to raise the legs higher, but for now this works. Also a table for your sewing machine that is large enough to hold your fabric.
Jun 12, 2019
LindaKayCollum
1
Jun 14, 2019
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Check out the bed risers that you can get at Wally World, Home Despot, etc. With this set, you can do some incremental heights.
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Jun 14, 2019
LaurenWhiteArthur
5
Jun 3, 2019
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my husband was kind enough to build me these shelves. He has since built a cutting table and is building me a sewing table that my machine sits inside. I have plastic drawers that fit in the cabinets below for favoring storage. This is my favorite room in our house!
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Jun 3, 2019
Mamabren
0
May 22, 2019
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I wish I had learned how to free motion quilt a long time ago
May 22, 2019
euxene
1
May 17, 2019
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I also took a folding wooden tv tray and made a ironing surface. I have a cutting mat that is a good fit so I can iron seams and trim without leaving my area. I have a small wood rectangle that Hubby cut to fit so my mat has a firm surface. the mat hangs on my sewing table so it stays nice and flat.
May 17, 2019
euxene
1
May 17, 2019
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hi Liz. I share my dining room for my sewing. I have my 75 year old baby dresser as my works in progress storage and the top drawer is my charms, hexes and layer cakes storage. I have a cart that shat im working on is in. My machine is in front of the double window for plenty of day light and reflected light in the evening. I have rolling drawers that I can hide with material( 2 1/2 strips , small cut for scrappy quilts and of course threads, rulers, bobbins cutters and scissors in organizers in the drawers. everything except the dresser is on rollers for easy hiding when we have company. This also keeps me close to Huddy.
May 17, 2019
MelB
6
May 15, 2019
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3 most important things: Good lighting; sturdy surface at appropriate height for sewing machine with enough surface space to support fabric when sewing large items such as quilts; and a pressing/cutting surface that is raised to an appropriate height so you are not bending and straining your back when cutting or pressing fabrics. Everything else will “fall” into place as you continue your crafting adventure based on what you are creating and the space you have to create in.
(Edited)
May 15, 2019
Rebecca1
3
May 1, 2019
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I keep most of my fabric in clear plastic drawers that are stackable. Keeps the dust off my stash and prevents fading from sunlight. I also like to keep my machine near a large bright window as I prefer to sew with natural light. I would also suggest investing in a wool pressing mat, keeps the heat from the iron so well that the underside of the block presses better, mass drop has these mats available from time to time, a great investment
(Edited)
May 1, 2019
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