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Audiopro
153
Nov 1, 2017
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I don't understand all this about the need for overly expensive knives when there are far less costly choices available. I stumbled upon a series of knives by "GoodCook" that are very sharp, surprisingly well made and can be maintained so with simple care practices. This brand is available at many of our supermarkets. I have 2 GoodCook, Japanese style, full tang, Santoku knives that have yet to go dull, like most cheap stainless steel knives.
A couple of simple rules keep them this way. 1. Never place them in an automatic dish washer. 2. Never let them soak in water for extended periods of time, just clean, rinse, dry and put away in a holder as soon as possible after use. 3. Re-hone the blade edge with a decent "steel" every so often. Mine have lasted for several years following this procedure and are still as sharp as the day I bought them. Each was less than $20 bought at Safeway, or Albertsons here in the west?
Nov 1, 2017
Duncan
3611
Nov 1, 2017
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Totally fair game to add to options like that to this poll. I think some people enjoy the act of simply making more of an investment even though you can find those 'cheaper' gems like you're mentioning. I have a nice Santoku at home that's probably worth $50, but after a year it's yet to show me signs of age. To each their own really.
Nov 1, 2017
Ruudh
30
Nov 2, 2017
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There are perfectly fine $40 shoes. Yet people buy $150 brandname shoes. Why is that? It's the exact same reason people buy $200 + knives ;) I'm a bit of a knife collector. I like something special to show off to friends and that no-one else has so for that purpose alone I'm totally fine investing in a quality knife.
In general you are right. But in that $20 to $50 range there is also a whole lot of garbage. I have 2 pairing knives, Jamie Oliver branded (no idea who actually makes them). Probably worth around $20. I got them for about $5 with some local supermarket coupons. These knives are great! They are the same steel as the much more expensive wusthof knives. They sharpen and stay sharp just as well. So yeah, I believe the steel of these is actually the decent german knife steel the big brands use. However, I also have some weirdo small chef knife that came in a set from Swedish designer brand Joseph Joseph. The whole set (5 small cutting boards and 5 knives costs about $80 here). It is the worst thing ever. The blade is incredibly thick, handle sucks. No balance whatsoever. Don't even get me started on the steel. I just can not get it sharp. The steel is just so soft it does not take an edge. I actually only use it to cut cheese now, and even that often is too much for it -_-'
In short. There are bargains, but by far not all of them are bargains. You have to know what to look for. And you'd have a terribly hard time finding a decent japanese high carbon steel chefs knife for that price range.
Nov 2, 2017
Audiopro
153
Nov 2, 2017
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I could care less about "cutlery for show." My knives, as well as other sharp implements, I own, are tools. They either perform as they are supposed to, or out they go. Yes I will admit that, as you say, there is a lot of garbage out there in the price range you mention, but knowing what to look for will help avoid it.
Like you, I too am a collector.., but more from a position of function than prestige. I am also aware of all of the types of steel from cheap stainless to full carbon. I especially miss the fine American cutlery companies that have disappeared over the last several decades, like Robeson Hammered, Harvard and Chicago Cutlery etc. CC made a particularly innovative stain resistant steel labeled "Special Steel" a high carbon, stainless mix, that were used mostly by the meat cutting and restaurant industries i.e. professional use. These industries could not risk using inferior tools and so chose knives that would hold up under constant use. Like many companies, in the USA, Chicago Cutlery sold out to some Asian buyer who wanted the name only and the resulting products bear little resemblance to the originals neither by form or function. or have disappeared altogether. BTW, few of the original CC knives were more expensive than $50 and could be found in hardware stores then, later, in fancy boutique department stores like NY's Fortunoffs. I often run across some of these brands in places like Goodwill or estate sales and I restore them, often giving them as gifts.
Here's to fine cutlery no matter the price.
Nov 2, 2017
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