Drop + Dan Clark Audio Aeon Open X Headphones
Drop + Dan Clark Audio Aeon Open X Headphones
bookmark_border
Where's the price?
To negotiate the best possible price for our customers, we agree to hide prices prior to logging in.
240 Sold
Free returns in USA
help
Product Description
We’ve partnered with Dan Clark Audio (formerly MrSpeakers) to improve a remarkable and well-regarded pair of planar open-back headphones. Introducing the Aeon Open X: our take on the Aeon Flow Open.
Here's what our community has to say
All of our reviews are from verified customers.
4.7
star_borderstar
star_borderstar
star_borderstar
star_borderstar
star_borderstar
21
check
89%
would recommend to a friend
search
tvr2500m
80
Feb 12, 2020
bookmark_border
star_borderstar
star_borderstar
star_borderstar
star_borderstar
star_borderstar
I'd been tracking the Mr. Speakers Aeon Flow Open for a long while as a headphone I'd like to try . When I saw Drop offer it, I bought it. I felt the Drop value proposition tilted the product in the right direction. I like the look of the Aeon. Fit and finish are excellent. It's super comfortable. I like the hard carrying/storage case. And it sounds great. Sonics... I've been listening now for a while. I have only listened with the one-notch white filter pad installed, so I haven't played around with different tunings. What struck me immediately on first listening to this headphone is that they sounded dull. Muffled, high frequencies attenuated, constrained dynamics, excessively midrange forward (like the Senn 580/600 family). Without me saying anything, other people who listened to them said the same. Not so much now. After spending many quality hours with them, I don't feel them to be lackluster or dull. I feel they're excellent. Midrange forward, yes. To me, their midrange presentation is very much like the Sennheiser 580/600, and even the Hifiman HE-400i (I have all of these and I like them all). I enjoy this midrange character. It does tend to stand a bit unnaturally forward in the musical mix, but it's also tonally very natural and organic, with good detail, texture, and palpable tonality. Compared with the Sennheiser 600 family and Hifiman 400i, all around this healthy midrange the Aeon includes a very nice representation of space, if not an especially expansive soundstage, good element blend/isolation balance to the mix, and a more restrained but all-there treble character. Oh, and the Aeon is more controlled and detailed in the lower frequencies, so there's better bass texture and definition. To be more specific, I've seen people make comparisons of this or that headphone to the Sennheiser 600 family. With the Aeon X, this is the first time I've felt a headphone I have reminds me strongly of the Drop x Sennheiser HD-6XX. The Aeon has a similar indulgent midrange, but with better midrange articulation, more air and high frequency extension, and more and tauter, more textured bass. Just that much more nuance across the board.
check
Would recommend to a friend.
(Edited)
Feb 12, 2020
tvr2500m
80
May 5, 2020
bookmark_border
Soundstage and imaging character. Yeah, good question. For comparison (especially in case you own or have heard them), the best imaging and soundstage experience I have via headphones are with the Drop x Focal Elexes. Focal has stated that they are trying to reproduce a loudspeaker listening experience with their headphones, and I get how the Elex is trying to get there. (I haven't head a headphone that comes close to the soundstage and imaging representation of a good two-channel system.) The Drop x DCA Aeon Open X doesn't cast as expansive a soundstage field or distant an image placement as the Elex. The Elex can do a better job of presenting things forward of the listener, getting closer to a more "natural" sound field experience. Things are presented as closer, again, more similar to the Senn 6XX family, but the Aeons are a step up pretty much everywhere. How far? Exactly? In meters? I'm listening right now to the Aeons via Tidal and JRiver, an SMSL SP200, and a Denafrips Ares II DAC. Listening through some live-recorded tracks. The Chesky Amber Rubarth Sessions from the 17th Ward binaural recording is a great soundstage test album. With this album, there's a lovely presentation of the captured space ambiance, with most of it feeling closer to the listener.
May 5, 2020
vvcv
9
May 13, 2020
bookmark_border
Hello, thanks for all the great info. you've shared. I've got to admit, i'm wide eyed due the the gear we share, then topped off with a recording we enjoy. The soundstage you described in post above was the question I was going to ask. I'm curious as to how you see/hear your Denafrips DAC contributing to this headphones' soundstage? I get the impression you feel this DAC/headphone pair does an above average job with this recording, and w/soundstage overall, is this correct (excluding the Focals)? A R-2R DAC is on my very short list. I tried Focal Clear headphones a couple of years ago, and wow, I could not bear to listen to a solo violinist jamming -someone got a good deal on those. With that in mind I also, agree with your two speaker system soundstage reference. I am a speaker person myself, and got into headphones to listen to my large symphonic recordings and world favorite conductor cycles. Classical is about 90% of what I listen to, and midrange is very important for me as well as a few trick to get some volume on very low piano octaves. I hope you don't mind a request, but would you mind comparing these headphones with your HiFiMan and Drop Senn 6XX while listening to a few minutes of a symphony you enjoy. Then perhaps sharing w/us your feedback regarding how good/differnt they are at finding the various instrument sections and rendering the concert hall when compared to the other headphones? Also, if you don't mind playing it on your Cavalli amp (I have the hybrid) would be a double bonus and would really appreciate it so so much. If you decide to try this test out, I am in no rush at all. I'm still learning the whole headphone system building thing. I only just got my real gear from Drop about a month ago. But I can say I like Planars a lot, but starting to like my wood frame Zeze 99 a lot as they break in. Turning into a real treat they are. Thanks again tvr2500m for all the info. you've already given -it's so close to what I was thinking about.
(Edited)
May 13, 2020
angstroms
78
Jan 4, 2020
bookmark_border
star_borderstar
star_borderstar
star_borderstar
star_borderstar
star_borderstar
Great feel, incredible sound even before full break in. Very nice sound stage with clean separation of vocals and instruments Note after 2 days of break in. dialing in filters ( none ) and the CEntrance DACport HD, ( High Gain) and figuring out what level volume need to get headphone to open up. Note I found many amp would just plateau. Now DACport HD is not perfect some EDM ( Moby, etc ) song will clip on DAC/AMP at volume. I wondered into an old album from the Squirrel Nut Zippers, "Hot". ( 1996). The third song "Memphis Exorcism" with beautiful Trumpet solos, kick and snare holding time with a upright bass thumping away, then guitar sliding in, AEON has sold solid separation with engaging detail and staging. Then the 7th song "Hell" rolls in with another the trumpet solo just draw you in, with Vocal and background singers make you feel like you down at Elephant room in Austin. Next big surprise was Taj Mahal's "Dust My Broom". the Harmonica feels like you blowing it , drums are holding time to the left and guitar is next to you. Walter "Wolfman" Washington "Save Your Love for Me" his deep vocal just layer forward over brooding jazz cords Tom Petty "Free Fallen". wow another great song on the Aeon. Love vocal, guitar, drums and separation, as back ground vocal slip in. This one staying in the collection, but I would recommend good DAC and higher power Headphone Amplifier. Example where you could use little more juice, U2's "Cedars of Lebanon" opening organ clips the CEntrance DACportHD. Update it works fantastic with the Xduoo XD05 Plus DAC/AMP, it really opens up the headset.
check
Would recommend to a friend.
(Edited)
Jan 4, 2020
Helpbot
271
Jan 15, 2020
bookmark_border
Did you mean to day Ananda has details in abundance? You mentioned comparing the too so I was wondering if it was a typo
Jan 15, 2020
angstroms
78
Jan 15, 2020
bookmark_border
I dropped that line now in text above. They both really have good detail, but I give Ananda has the edge at all volume of music. Aeon X is warmer, when you go back to the Ananada it can sound little drier. Now both headphone even though they low Ohm, they really need better amp pull the detail out of them. I finally have amp with enough current (mA) to support Aeon X, note it lot hungrier for current then the Ananda. The Headphone which is more efficient than Ananda is Focal Elex, this another topic. Sound stage is bigger on the Ananda and Elex, Perl Jam "Rival" proves this. Right now I say the Mid-fi Headphone space is pretty special, At the top Focal Elex/Elear and Hifiman Ananda are working to take top crown, each are fantastic on there own right. Then there is specialist Aeon X if you want something more intimate for vocals with solid detail and instrument separation. One update I have the XDO5 Plus amp and DAC with AK4493, I will soon have a TCA HPA-1 amp https://www.tomchr.com which I am really looking forward too to open up headphones more, leave them bare as they say...
Jan 15, 2020
Zilfallion
135
Dec 26, 2019
bookmark_border
star_borderstar
star_borderstar
star_borderstar
star_borderstar
star_borderstar
Preface: I wrote the vast majority of this review last Thursday, my fourth day with these headphones(I got them last Monday). Editted it Friday and gave it to Drop. Have had these almost a week since I wrote the review and stand by the majority of what I said. There's a few things I've tweaked here compared to what'll be up on Drop.com, but nothing major. I'm not being compensated for the review, and I'm sending the unit back into Drop tomorrow. So to start with a bit about my preferences. I really like forward vocals, especially female vocals. I'm fairly treble tolerant when it comes to peaks, and in general prefer my treble relatively neutral. I think my HD 6XX has really skewed my perception of lower-mids, so that's something to keep in mind. Most of my references will be coming from my fairly worn-in Sennheiser HD6XX, with a few references to the Koss ESP/95X and Focal Elex I tried for a week very recently. I do not own and have not heard an Aeon Flow before, so I do not know if there's any difference between the regular Aeon Flow and the Aeon Flow X. Having now seen the Drop page for them, it does seem like at least the pads are changed and some of the damping. Packaging: I'm assuming a lot of the packaging is stuff Dan had leftover from before the name change from MrSpeakers to Dan Clark Audio as the sticker on the box on my review unit says MrSpeakers, and the headphone case inside also says MrSpeakers. The box isn't particularly anything special, which I don't mind if it saves some cost. I do like that it at least has a magnet to keep the box closed. The case is nice. Fits the headphones rather well with enough room in a pocket to throw the cable and potentially a few other accessories. I expect we might see a small change in the naming as the existing stock of the old runs out. Build Notes: The cable seems to use the same connectors as I see many other Dan Clark Audio(Formerly MrSpeakers) headphones use. They do lock-in rather securely and are also very easy to remove, but will make finding an aftermarket cable a fair bit harder. The cable's y-split is rather far down. I would have liked for it to be about eight inches higher, as I think that would have also helped on the cable microphonics which is not great and rather noticeable above the y-split. It terminates with a 3.5mm plug and a screw-on 6.3mm adapter. I am a fan of this solution personally over a plain 6.3mm plug. The headband is super flexible, the strap could be replaced fairly easily from the look of things if need be or desired. There is no creaking that I can hear from these, which is nice. My kitchen scale that's not the most accurate, but good enough for my pizza dough weigh these in at 334 grams without the cable. Comfort: I like these for the most part. The pads are sufficiently large enough and deep enough my ears don't touch anything while also being rather soft. I like the feel of leather-type pads over velour most of the time(just a personal thing). They don't feel super heavy. The weight is fairly well distributed on the headband. The clamp isn't too high once you adjust the strap's position a little, but does give it a decent grip. My ears do get a little bit warm over long sessions, which is to be fairly expected with leather pads. The strap has a texture on the bottom of it that has a fair bit of grip to it. Once you put it on your head, it doesn't slide around without bringing your hair with it. If you want to adjust the strap back on your head a little you should probably lift the entire headphone a little and reseat if you don't want to mess up your hair. I didn't find it to be a significant issue, but it's worth noting. One rather important thing to note though is the pressure you get from a sealed front-volume on planars like this. Getting used to this coming from headphones with very open front volumes has taken some time and one of the main reasons I've had to take short breaks from the headphones. It's something I've gotten used to. By the fourth day, it stopped bothering me nearly as much as it did the first day and is much less noticeable. They're nice and secure for front and back headbanging, they shift just a little but not too much when you headbang decently strong. Side to side head shakes do cause them to wobble around a bit due to the flexible headband, but they still stay on your ears. My glasses don't really seem to affect the seal much at all on these headphones, but they aren't particularly large frames that I've been wearing for years and have slightly indented my head in some spots. Isolation and Leakage: This headphone kind of surprised me here. It isolates noticeably more than my HD6XX. It's harder to notice someone talking to you from another room or that UPS came to deliver a package with this pair on, especially once you have some music going. This isolation does make your voice speaking also sound a little weird, but anyone who uses IEMs or earplugs a bit will be used to that. Somehow it also leaks sound quite a bit as well. With my HD6XX at a reasonable volume, I can put them down on my desk and barely hear them. With the Aeon Flow X at a similar volume, I can set them down on my desk, walk ten feet over to my door and still hear them. People nearby will definitely hear what you're listening to. Sources I used: The vast bulk of my listening was through a JDS Labs The Element(first generation), fed by either Foobar2000 local .flac files or Spotify Premium with quality settings maxed. They do require a fair bit more power than their impedance alone would suggest due to their rather low sensitivity, though not quite as much as my HD 6XX need. I did briefly test them off a Samsung Galaxy S5, A50, iPhone 5, and LG V30. All of which got them to a fairly loud level, though the iPhone 5 seemed to be a little quieter than the rest. Personally, I'd be fine using these headphones off of any of these long term. Bass: The bass is really well extended on these. It doesn't seem quite perfectly flat, but the sub-bass is quite clearly audible in songs. Bass also sounds a lot cleaner than when boosting up the HD 6XX's sub-bass to get it somewhat close in level. I like just a little bit more of a mid-bass bump than these have, but after an adjustment period found they didn't really need it. Mids: They're very clear, but tilting to the warm side in the lower mids. They don't seem quite as warm as my worn-in HD 6XX's lower mids are, but close. The upper mids are just a bit more relaxed than the HD 6XX's rather forward upper mids. A little bit more on the upper mids later as we transition into the treble. Filters primer: Before getting into this, I want to mention the included tuning filters. These affect primarily treble response as far as I can tell. The differences between filters are not incredibly large, but they are slightly different. Most of my listening was done with the 1-notch and 2-notch white felt filters. Will go into a bit more depth after the treble. Treble: These are a little bit on the darker side when it comes to the treble in general compared to my HD 6XX. Not by a lot, but noticeable. There's a noticeable dip between 2.6kHz and 4kHz, and then there's a rise around 7kHz up to a peak around 7.8kHz This comes down fairly quick afterward by around 8.5kHz then another but much smaller peak around 11.2kHz and drops off a bit after that. All according to my ears and sine sweeps. The 2.6-4kHz dip is the thing I find my focus on the most. I am not personally a fan of dips around 4kHz. To my ears they make certain female vocalists seem just a little bit dull. Nightwish's Elan is the song I always see one of the biggest differences from correcting dips in this area. Fixing that dip with EQ just always seems to bring the vocal image just slightly up and out of the rest of the instrumentation to give it more clarity. The 7.8kHz peak I found was high enough in frequency to not cause any sibilance. Resolution and detail were quite good on the chimes in Erutan's The Willow Maid. Overall a little bit lower than neutral treble level, but the detail was still there and clearly audible. Filters: The filters are important. With them, the 7.8kHz treble peak is much less noticeable in music. You'll still hear it in sine sweeps, but all of them really take a lot of the perceived sharpness out of that peak. Overall, I didn't find them immensely different, with the changes between filters being rather small and mostly about how much treble you get. Most of my filter comparisons included swapping to both of the same filters for a time as well as putting one filter of one type in one ear, and one filter of the other type in the other ear, and setting my output to Mono so I can more easily hear the differences. The included card telling you about them does match my general feelings in how much they damp. In order of most damping to least damping, 1-Notch White Felt, Black Foam, Black Felt, 2-Notch White felt. 1-Notch white felts are put in when you get them. I feel like these make them just a little too dark for me. The black felt and black foam attenuate slightly less in general, but it felt like too small a difference. The 2-Notch filters seemed like they made the 2.6-4kHz dip seem the least obvious, though for some reason in this specific area it felt like the black foams made the dip just a little less obvious than the black felts, despite the felts damping less. I still found myself relying on EQ to fix that area. Around 5.5kHz, the black felt and foam did feel just very very slightly elevated compared to the white felts. One area of concern with mixing and matching filters is their total width. The black foams, in particular, are just barely thick enough that the edge of my ear rests just against them, but none of the other filters are thick enough on their own to be an issue for me, however, if you start combining them because you want a darker sound signature, you might start to feel them. I don't think this will be an issue for most people though. Just to reiterate though, a lot of these differences are really small and I spent a lot of time trying to find differences in them other than the general volume level and shift of the central imagine when using different filters in each ear. Soundstage: They pan to the sides just a little bit wider than my HD 6XX's rather small soundstage. They aren't as tall of a stage as the Koss ESP/95X were though. Imaging seems to be quite accurate in Vermintide for special enemy spotting, my typical gaming test. Dynamics: This is something that's always brought up in discussions about MrSpeakers' headphones. To my ears, yes, there is just a bit of dynamic compression. They lack the impact and punch of something like the Elex but aren't significantly more compressed than my HD 6XX. I notice this mostly on quieter volumes. The overall darker nature of these and the lack of a more distinct midbass hump do seem to slightly contribute to this. At higher volumes, I didn't find the compression to be that bad, especially with a slight bump to midbass from EQ. It's still audible though. Equalizing: So what I settled on that let me like these a bit more than stock was a +3dB boost at 120Hz Q:1.2, +3dB boost at 3.2kHz Q:3, and 7.8kHz -3dB Q:5. Small adjustments, but enough to shift it a bit more into my preferences. Conclusions then: They're a solidly built comfortable headphone. I enjoyed them while I had them as they were something new and different. After finishing my review, I honestly kept using these instead of switching back to my HD 6XX. Mostly for the better comfort. These were great for watching things like movies or shows with the much better bass extension. I didn't like these quite as much for music. The upper mids and treble are just a little more recessed than I personally like combined with that slight compressed sound to them meant they just weren't for me. I still think they're good headphones, just not what I'm looking for as an upgrade.
(Edited by moderator jssullivan)
Dec 26, 2019
Adorni
44
Jan 7, 2020
bookmark_border
It isn't impression, this is information from the producer
Jan 7, 2020
DizzyFred
11
Jan 13, 2020
bookmark_border
Great review man!
Jan 13, 2020
allage
39
Feb 14, 2020
bookmark_border
star_borderstar
star_borderstar
star_borderstar
star_borderstar
star_borderstar
Amazing But Very Odd
These are really amazing, but very odd, and only one flaw overall that cant be overcome. Good
  1. premium build
  2. light weight
  3. good non offensive scenting on them out of box
  4. good clamp force
  5. sound is highly detailed, more so than the Focals in side by side except for upper treble,
  6. no exaggeration, but inserts can make certain aspects more elevated tonality wise.
  7. very portable, at least more so than most Bluetooth noise canceling headphones.
  8. comfortable strap and earpads.
Bad
  1. almost no sound stage to speak of, but good image isolation for left and right.
  2. overly intimate sound, almost like an IEM.
  3. very picky as to what you use as a sound source, almost makes it pointless to make them portable. but overall really cheap options work with the aeons so less of an issue; I used an e1da.
  4. balanced is what i recommend, tried multiple balanced sources, even ones with both SE and balanced, i do wish this did come with a balanced connector of some kind.
Conclusion: if you want something to go on a trip, and want something to bring with you that can fit tonality of anything you would listen to, this is it really. its open sounding enough to recognize that its open, but not with the open sound stage. if this had a competitor, which i dont think this really does, i would say the Audeze iSine 10 are really the only thing, but the 10s are so uncomfortable to wear for more than an hour at a time, or slightly more if you use ear hooks and smaller eartips; overall i think the aeons are standalone, they have competition in sound stage for the price, but not really clarity, especially not this portable.
check
Would recommend to a friend.
(Edited)
Feb 14, 2020
SchiitMyPants
47
Mar 7, 2020
bookmark_border
star_borderstar
star_borderstar
star_borderstar
star_borderstar
star_borderstar
Loving these so far. Check out the video for detailed first impressions.
https://youtu.be/mYCWB5sdz9I The overall signature is L-shaped with linear treble/mids and elevated mid-bass. They make every track sound like a party. Classic Dan Clark/MrSpeakers comfort. Surprisingly easy to drive for a full-size planar.
check
Would recommend to a friend.
Mar 7, 2020
Dandrey
7
May 22, 2020
bookmark_border
star_borderstar
star_borderstar
star_borderstar
star_borderstar
star_borderstar
Rich Detailed Punchy Dynamic Resolving Low and High end Extended Quality Build Superb
Punchy dynamic Extended On top and bottom with superb lush very detailed mids not shouty upper midrange and oh my Gods that low end and texture , resolution everywhere , detail in tracks you did not hear before , soundstage with good imaging , separation and multilayering of instruments ,top of the line quality build and comfort , compact alien space looking nicer material production nitinol pleather (nobody got killed and skinned ) they feel look and sound rich quality and very very good , luxurious i would say , that's the proper word . And yeah , no M1060c Open mod can do that for sure , been comparing back and forth for a couple of hours today . Some dummy said they they sound muffled , some idiot told they are lackluster on punch and dynamics , one not genious claimed there is a compression at times not enough resolving or some other stupid shit (Hello , now you know that your recordings are not well produced , suprise , surprise !) and you know who said , quote : they are a hair more fun than plain boring..WHHATT !!?? You weirdos better take those pillows out your ears and stop lying to people , these are Superb ! Its my second day of ownership and i am ecstatic , baby , for sure ! Technical death Metal , electronic of all kinds , world music , classical , acoustic , hip hop , Drum'n'bass , dubstep , ambient , chillout , psytrance , dub , you name it, everything on'em sounds purely Fantastic, yes ! And i didn't pass my 15 hours of burn in even . 2 things 2 consider though : ya gonna need an amp ( no LG G8 no 75 knots max still no ) and if your music production or mastering is whack ya gonna know that , otherwise - its a damn fine audiophiliac top of the line product which sounds extremely pleasing . Still don't get it ? - Just grab it for 499 until Mr Clark and Homies at the Drop changed their mind , cuz these shoot way above their price , definiteily ! P.S : Big shout out to Mr Clark and Drop Crew for having a very fine tuned ears . Zifallion , you must be deaf or retarded in other way to compare these to 58X or 6XX , which i own and love , by the way , Aeons blow those beginner tier still audiophiliac phones out the water easy , easy . And those guys like Zifallion who try to sound reasonable and give not proper review while praising way lesser products, you are the main reason i did not buy Aeons 3 months before .. I am out , standing behind every word i said .
check
Would recommend to a friend.
(Edited)
May 22, 2020
FISTDEYUMA
32
Apr 9, 2020
bookmark_border
star_borderstar
star_borderstar
star_borderstar
star_borderstar
star_borderstar
One of my most used
I use cans while reading and working on the computer. My HD800s are used when reading. This replaced my HD600 as my computer cans. This means when working on projects are gaming. Gaming is generally with a friend using a Alexa Echo as he in hundreds of miles away. We play from 8am to 5pm in Sunday. Many times my other cans have been hard on my head. Not these. Hours on end without a problem. I use a GUSTARD A20H in balanced mode. I was happy to see I could get a adaptor for this rather cheaply. The days of spending hundreds for a poorly made balanced cable are at an end.
close
Would not recommend to a friend.
(Edited)
Apr 9, 2020
illtrick
14
May 5, 2020
bookmark_border
star_borderstar
star_borderstar
star_borderstar
star_borderstar
star_borderstar
Luxuary build, comfort, and sound with a finiky cable
I won't expound on the sound signature or any characteristics of this device. There are far more "qualified" people to do that in the world. The key to me with headphones is build quality and comfort. Most modern headphones in the above $200 range are going to sound great but not all are well built and comfortable. I simply couldn't find a better combination of build quality and comfort in a planar headphone at this price range. I'm sure I would have ponied up the extra dough for Audeze's because almost entirely because of the larger community (easy to find 3rd party pads and wires) but they lost mega comfort points because they are significantly heavier (and are alleged to have greater clamp force). The build quality on these is awesome. I have yet to see online a photo that does these justice. (Dan if you're reading this you need to find yourself a solid graphic designer to do some quality renderings!) Too many other headphones I've owned get "tired" in a year or two because of all the moving parts and plastic on plastic interfaces. (HD650's and AKG Q701's) I'm looking at you! There are only two moving parts on these headphones and it's a metal on metal interface which shouldn't weaken or get noisy over time. In fact I argue that for these open versions that's a reason not to buy the Aeon 2 opens. The Aeon 2 closed is a different story as portability is a legit use case. The nitinol headband is an elegant means of achieving high comfort with fewer moving parts. My only dislike on the headphone build quality is the choice of an adhesive used on the earpads rather than a mechanical coupling, though far from a deal breaker. For comfort the earcup dimensions (42mmx78mm inside) are sufficiently large for my sufficiently large ears. I don't tollerate on-ear headphones under pretty much any circumstance so the dimensions of the earpads often disqualifies headphones faster than any other reason. These pads are very comfortable and don't get nearly as hot as some of the headphones I own but do get hotter than my AKG Q701's. The headband is adjustable and does a decent job of managing clamp force but I do wish the clamp force was lower (I do have a large head though). Sometimes I do find that I have to make micro adjustments to their position / angle to achieve better comfort, I attribute this mainly to the clamp force. As reference these have a bit less clamp force than my Beyerdynamic DT770 (which I believe is pretty much the same as any of their models using the same headband) and a good bit more than either my AKG Q701's or HD553's. The only comfort factor that makes me wonder about the longevity of these in my collection is force of the earpad on the very top of the jaw, I'm guessing that with a little break in of the pads and my own conditioning this will subside. Last and certainly least is the cable. The positives: I like the connector far better than the mini-xlr by a mile, the TRS jack is sufficient quality and most importantly the cable works reliably. It's just what's between the connectors that bums me out. The cable isn't pliable enough to avoid getting twisted up annoyingly and the cable sheath could be tighter as well. I already bought the connectors from Dan's website and am waiting on making the balanced / unbalanced decision to buy the wire to make my own cable.
check
Would recommend to a friend.
May 5, 2020
illtrick
14
May 7, 2020
bookmark_border
Mine included all of the tuning pads and partially fenestrated ear pads as expected. If it weren’t for previous positive experiences dealing directly with Dan Clark Audio I would have worried more about it, but from my personal experience they want their users to be happy and will work with you if there are any mistakes. Drop has a good return policy on this item so don’t sweat it.
May 7, 2020
jimmymizell
12
May 7, 2020
bookmark_border
Thanks for the reply. That puts my mind at ease.
May 7, 2020
Palmski
8
May 19, 2020
bookmark_border
star_borderstar
star_borderstar
star_borderstar
star_borderstar
star_borderstar
Huge Upgrade
First of all, I’m not an audiophile (though I may now be going down that path) but these things sound amazing and they keep getting better! The first day they did sound a bit flat, but I played some pink noise on them for 24 hours and man they opened up! For gaming I would say these are perfect. I am able to pick up footsteps like never before, and I’m coming from a set of Sennheiser GSP 600’s. Every day they sound more and more open and the range is really expanding (again I’m not an audiophile so I don’t much in the proper “terms” department) The ear pads are perforated on the front edge, I know early ones were not so that seems to be fixed. The case these cake is super heavy duty as well, not needed in my situation but it reflects on the build quality. I did just order a balanced XLR cable, as I have read that it helps with left and right separation over the SE cable it comes with. All in all, absolutely amazing and at 500 bucks, I feel they are a steal! I also just returned a pair of DT 990’s because they were just too open and honestly felt cheaply made.
check
Would recommend to a friend.
May 19, 2020
K.max
1
Feb 28, 2020
bookmark_border
star_borderstar
star_borderstar
star_borderstar
star_borderstar
star_borderstar
Warm signature overall audio but amp picky
Very intimate sound eventhough they are open back very warm vocal based signature .very very amp picky and on some amps with hi gain alot of distortion and others no I am still to figuring out why distortion on some and no on others I think the output voltage plays a role .and I recommend balanced cable and powerful amp for these cans.
check
Would recommend to a friend.
Feb 28, 2020
parowOOz
5
Mar 19, 2020
bookmark_border
They are very low impedance headphones so they are most likely quite sensitive (like IEMs). High gain in most amps introduces significantly more noise/distortion to deliver higher power. Another thing to consider is the damping factor. If your source has high output impedance it might struggle to drive these cans correctly. Preferrably you'd want something like the SMSL SP200 or Drop's THX 789 which have close to 0 output impedance AND enough grunt to drive current-heavy headphones :)
Mar 19, 2020
K.max
1
Mar 21, 2020
bookmark_border
Thank you for explaining.
Mar 21, 2020
Showing 73 of 98