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Buttercookie
31
Mar 26, 2018
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Almost 17 pounds of water, is that doable on a long hike? I've carried more total weight in a pack but that is better balanced
Mar 26, 2018
splendic
44
Mar 26, 2018
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It's collapsible, so you could keep 'reshaping' the container as you drink to avoid sloshing or moving around your bag, but if you really wanted a large bladder dedicated for hiking, I'd look at something that has a hanging loop, so it stays in place.
Also, for people that really need a LOT of water (sharers, heavy sweaters on single day summer hikes), 6L bladders are probably enough, and come in more hiking-friendly designs.
Mar 26, 2018
TheBeardedCakeasaur
60
Mar 27, 2018
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This has two attachment points on one side, what appears to be a hanging loop, and a strap on the other? I'm confused by your "... hanging loop..." statement -- Unless I'm reading it wrong? Nothing negative meant by this, and not trying to start some flame war = was hoping you might clarify? I'm responding to Buttercookie as well!
Mar 27, 2018
TheBeardedCakeasaur
60
Mar 27, 2018
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I don't have this specific 8L bladder, but was intrigued by this drop. I do have the Hydrapak 3L Trek kit, which has a similar style bladder, quick-connect cap, style, attachment points, and comes with a silicone squeeze valve. I also have 4x 2L bladders of the same style that my 2 60lb Shepard-Huskies carry (2 each, one in each side of their harness/packs). Whenever I backpack with my dogs, I'm always prepared to carry their packs if the need arises. I typically will take a 70L pack for this very reason, but fill it like I'd normally fill my 50L. On two occasions, I've had to haul their water, because it was 80*F+/humid, and I didn't want to risk them overheating. That was near 8L of water on top of the 3L I was carrying. Using the loops, I bundled 2 of them together, and strapped them to the rear of my pack. I put the other 2 in my mesh sleeves on the sides of my pack. It was heavy as shit, but I managed it for 22 miles, drinking along the way, and my pack weight was around 50lbs with the added weight. 50lbs isn't so bad, but with the dogs, I don't typically get to use my Trekking poles - and they pull me like a sled. I tend to overcompensate a bit when I'm with my dogs, but I've watched them down most of that water in a day, used the rest to pour onto them to cool, clean, or otherwise. They don't tend to care how much they spill or drool out, either, haha... I generally will pack-mule water if the little-lady joins me, as well. I love these containers, either way, and I use the 2L bladders daily to refill their water bowls. They collapse, weigh nothing, and I've got almost a year on them with no problems whatsoever. I'd say it's doable with 8L, but hike your own hike -- I would think if you're carrying this, you're either sharing weight elsewhere with your group, or you're setting up camp for the night and filling this up near camp. (and maybe planning a base-camp, shower setup, or group replenish).
Mar 27, 2018
splendic
44
Mar 27, 2018
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A hanging loop like most hydration packs use to secure bladders.
This one does have lash points toward the top which I didn't notice.
Mar 27, 2018
TheBeardedCakeasaur
60
Mar 27, 2018
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I've used the black attachment loops on my Trek to hang it in my bag both upside down and right side up. I've also just laid it across the top of the pack under the lid, and inside of the pack the same way. It hasn't hindered me, yet, nor has the circular cap (rather, I haven't noticed it, at least). I'm starting to prefer laying it across/under the lid of my pack to the inner-pouch vertical hang... provided I'm not too over-stuffed, that is. Thanks for the reply!
Mar 27, 2018
Sweet, a double dog hiker! Offtopic, but: I do the same as you, putting water in their packs, b/c I find it easiest to balance load that way and water bottle can get wet if dog pack gets wet. Right now I use 1L Smartwater bottles for larger dog (1 per side), and 750mL for the other dog. Do you think that's a good setup, or do you rec. bladders instead? I realize in your case with 2L per side a bladder is likely the only option.
Other question, how do you manage hiking with two dogs? Right now I go to remote areas where off leash is allowed and humans are rare, but I'd like to hike in populated/leashed areas, and haven't figured out a good way to manage them.
One of my dogs is stop/start all the time, the other always moving forward, so I get yanked in two directions while on leash. I was thinking of attaching them somehow... I've used a leash splitter before, but when they are close together they step on it and get tangled. To solve this, I thought about using CPVC pipe, the way I use it for my pulk (the cord is what connects you to pulk, but the PVC pipe the cord runs through keeps your pulk from hitting your ankles if you stop).
I also notice skijors/canicross people use leashes that are partially bungee/stretch webbing. This seems like a good idea as well.
Any advice would be much appreciated! Thanks!
Mar 29, 2018
TheBeardedCakeasaur
60
Mar 29, 2018
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I originally had a few Platypus 1L bottles, and a few 1-2L conventional bladders with hoses that I used simply because they were available. At one point I had them carrying Nalgene bottles, because they are indestructable. I figured in a pinch I could use them as well, if I ever needed to drink. It definitely is easier to balance their packs, and as we walk, I use my own bladder/valve to fill bowls on the go -- that way, they stay balanced, and it lets them use energy so when I sleep, they sleep! The Platypus bottles worked fine, but they didn't flex as much when full, and I had one puncture on me. I don't always fill the bladders full, but they have notches that I can measure with to keep it balanced.
I actually purchased a Hydrapak Trek Kit 3L to test, from Massdrop, due to the fact that it came with a multi-attachment cap and a silicone squeeze valve. I use this for quick filling dog bowls from my bladder, squirting the dogs to be an ass, etc -- it spits water, and I've found it really useful for being a slightly heavier/bulky water delivery. I decided to pick up a few of the Hydrapak Seeker 2L bladders because they are identical to the Trek bladder. I could swap the caps if need be, hang them the same, etc. They also are shaped nice for my dogs packs, imo, and I find they are malleable. My dogs carry the weight of the 2x2L really well, and it lets them work on the trail. The bladder style, I feel, hugs their bodies more, are longer due to the tube-shape, and hopefully more comfortable for them to carry. They've held up to being beat around by the dogs, and every day use here at home to fill the water bowls. I was personally happier once I moved to this setup, the dogs don't seem to notice!
Both dogs are Shepard-Husky mixes, 2 year olds, at 60lbs each. They're fit and strong, and very prey driven. I can't really let them off of a leash, unfortunately, because, while they listen to commands at home, as soon as they are on the trail they are too excited. After a few miles they pull a little bit less, and relax a little, but I don't trust them not to go diving after everything that moves -- and we hike around Copperheads / Rattlesnakes, often.
Both have identical leashes, that have a "traffic handle" on them. I hook these to the backs of their harnesses and walk them using a carabiner to attach the two traffic handles together, creating a Y. I want the option to separate the two, so this works best for me. Both dogs tend to run forward, stop to smell, run forward, etc. Having them attached together like this makes it to where they pull one another if they stop, so I save energy, and they typically like to be near one another anyway. This would likely help with your dogs. I try to pay attention to when they've used the restroom last, as it can be a bit awkward to have them attached like this and take a dump! I also keep a 'biner on each leash end at my hand, so that I can quickly clip them to my pack/belt, around a tree, or around my waste/leg in case I need to go hands free. This comes into play later, as well, when at camp (or at pubs that allow dogs, haha). The dogs also carry their own Gentle-Leads, in case they are out of control, so they will relax simply by having those on (but I rarely ever need to use these -- last time I did, there was 2 inches of solid ice covering the rocks we were walking on, and I used it so they didn't pull me off of the side to my death, ahha)
When at camp, I typically will tie the dogs off to a tree, and setup shop. I have them each carry 1 part of a 2 part set of Hammock straps - the kind with the multiple loops sewn in. This way, I can give them a bit of space to explore at camp, shorten up the length or daisy-chain them if need be, and not have to worry about them pulling or eating quickly through thick nylon-web-straps. They carry them, so no extra weight penalty for me, and they work as a leash if I need it.
I've not used the stretchy-leads with the dogs, but I doubt I will, either. I'd rather rely on my tried and true nylon-webbing. I can provide you a gear list of what I have, links, or the like, too, if you want. Sorry for the wall of text -- I figured details might be better!
Hope this helps!
-Mark
Mar 29, 2018
Thank you so much Mark! And you are right, details are definitely better! I shall experiment next time I go to the park with them. Thanks again :-)
Apr 2, 2018
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