Scissor switch is the best

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ETA: I guess I agree with this guy lol https://www.lifehacker.com.au/2018/07/stuff-mechanical-why-your-next-keyboard-should-be-a-scissor-switch/ Ok I just found out that scissor switch isn't considered "mechanical" but hey, it's still mechanical in the broader sense. I'm trying to go from wired to wireless and found that mechanical has taken over the high end keyboard community. I got a big Cherry MX tester and none of them feel as good as my trusty scissor switch (Enermax Caesar). It's kind of like Cherry MX Tactile Gray, except with much shorter travel and much more tactile. The recovery is much more crisp. I also like the low profile keys better as you can feel between the keys more comfortably vs the deeper canyons between standard size keycaps. Another advantage of scissor switch is that it's also a stabilizer. No wobbliness compared to even $200 mechanical keyboards. So I'll be trying out the Logi Craft and MS Sculpt, forgoing RGB and replaceable keycaps because the feel of the switches is my top priority. And low profile, tactile, crisp keys are awesome for typing. I get the feeling most people haven't gotten to experience it. Perhaps low profile Kailh has some potential but they're only available in blue. Here's hoping scissor switch makes a comeback and that you guys get to try it out.
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sircanada
0
Aug 30, 2020
did you ever find a keyboard replacement that you like? you seem to share the same desire I do for a tactile scissor switch, or something like that.
Tosel
158
Feb 18, 2019
It's not that mechanical keyboards are crap, it's just that you only tried cherry mx style switches, a kind of switch probably designed as linear and then somewhat crudely adapted to be also tactile or clicky. From your description of the scissor keyboard I understand that you really enjoy tactile switches, a kind that in my opinion is the most difficult to design as mechanical! In my case tactile switches are my least favorite of the group, as I prefer clickys that are even more tactile as they don't need to be designed to suppress sound. Check the thick clickbar kailh, box jade and navy: if you don't mind the noise (rather high pitched too unfortunately) they have an exceptional sensation of tactility as the force drops suddenly, not in a slope of 1 mm of travel! Or if you want to check one of the finest switches ever made try buckling springs (model M or even better F, or a new unicomp). You get the advantage of a kind of tactility similar to box navy, maybe a little less in amount, but with an infinite smoothness, great sound and zero wobble (one of the problems of cherry design, mostly solved by box design).
parmenio
2
Feb 18, 2019
I also tried Razer though I understand they're clones. I like'em quiet, and the scissor switch is very quiet, and can be silent if necessary (typing slowly). The Cherry Browns feel very mushy to me; I also suggest you try some good scissor switches if you haven't, in the ~75g actuation force range. They feel tactical like clickies but but without the loud noises. Maybe I can get used to noise after a while but it's definitely not for office environments; I have a coworker with Cherry Browns and even they sound loud due to the bottoming out. O-rings seem to make very little difference with those; the rings are still pretty hard. I can hear the clickety clacks for a several-row radius lol. The scissor switch keyboards are more or less inaudible over general white noise. My main complaint with the mainstream scissor switch options such as the Apples is the chiclet keycaps; I prefer slopes with shallow key travel so that your hand can glide over keys, such as on the Enermax. Normal mechanical keycaps are also bad in this regard; the canyons are deep between keys.
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Tosel
158
Feb 19, 2019
I understand what you are saying, but don't think that because they are clones zeal, kailhua, gateron, razer etc. are intrinsically inferior to cherry! I too did this wrong assumption! Based on what you wrote I think topre might fit your needs, similar to rubber domes, but with the advantage of not needing to bottom out to register (and with 3 settings for actuation point!). Another maybe cheaper option but still silent and mechanical would be a keyboard with alps dampened cream, the most common one should be the apple extended keyboard.
dvorcol
5255
Feb 18, 2019
Scissor switches are frequently used on laptops. The cap movement is mechanical, but the electrical connection is membrane. So low-volume custom production is prohibitively expensive. And the keycaps are usually unique per manufacturer, so designer sets are impossible.
parmenio
2
Feb 18, 2019
Designer sets and large scale production just require some standardization but that requires an enthusiast community. Ah well. Maybe I'll get mechanical for work just to ease into it and eventually be able to take advantage of the large community and customization.
sntXrrr
27
Feb 17, 2019
Most people in the keyboard community would call you crazy and try to persuade you to try some of the community favorite tactile switches such as Zealios V2 or something Holy Panda-like. But in the end this is all personal preference and you might want to check out this pre-order https://en.zfrontier.com/products/morgrie-rie60 It is wireless and low profile and looks pretty high-end for a very reasonable price.
parmenio
2
Feb 17, 2019
That's 1 frustrating thing these days, the only way to try is to buy first. Even big box stores don't have floor samples for all the stuff on their shelves. I've bought and returned some keyboards already, Cherry and Razer based, and I'm getting shopping fatigue. Hadn't tried Zealios so will keep an eye out for it. Since that Morgrie drop isn't till June, I may revisit then if the Craft isn't holding down the fort for me. Just looking at the 3 available switches though, they don't seem to be the tactile non-clicky, ~75g style that I like.
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