tsukiyooo
0
Oct 27, 2017
bookmark_border
I've been experimenting as a recent convert to coffee, and I've been making a lot of French press at home with preground coffee beans. I'm interested in getting a grinder, but am also thinking of ways to diversify my coffee making. Apart from a grinder recommendation, would a moka pot or a drip style be more suited to getting the full flavor from coffee beans?
Oct 27, 2017
jspiers
22
Oct 27, 2017
bookmark_border
Moka pot and pour over are my two primary brew methods, and they are both great in their own way. If you're looking for something similar to french press in flavour and strength, and you enjoy the ritual of making coffee, then pour over is the way to go. I use a Hario V60 cone with a cheap scale I bought off Amazon and a regular kettle I've had for years. For a stronger, espresso-like drink, I get great results with my Moka pots. I have a 3-cup for myself and a 6-cup when brewing for two. It's not true espresso because the pressure doesn't get as high, but it makes a thick, almost chocolatey coffee that I very much enjoy. Regardless, you'll want to make sure you're using an appropriate grind size for your brew method. There are lots of videos on YouTube that go into this in detail.
Oct 27, 2017
Dr.McCoy
344
Oct 27, 2017
bookmark_border
Moka pots are honestly difficult to make coffee that features anything but roast profile. They have a tendency to burn the bean. Definitely go with drip or pour over.
A good grinder is the best thing you can do to up your coffee game. French press and cold brew require somewhat specialty grinders though so you may want to consider how interested you are in persuing other methods before investing in a FP-focused grinder.
Oct 27, 2017
Warblerick
5
Oct 27, 2017
bookmark_border
After more than 4 decades of coffee drinking, we've tried almost every style of preperation out there. Our last good machine was a $1500+ Capresso unit that ground the coffee fresh for each cup. So when that stopped working, we were looking for something less expensive and longer lasting. I did my homework and came across the Bialetti Moka express (in red, 6 cup), and we've been extremely happy with it. Makes super strong Italian style coffee, just the way we like it, in under 10 minutes. No real moving parts to break, and only a rubber gasket to wear out and replace. 5 stars!!
Oct 27, 2017
CallieT
13
Oct 27, 2017
bookmark_border
Honestly get yourself a hand held ceramic conical burr grinder (about 60new hit up gumtree or craigslist). Then get an aero press. It’s like a French press but you pass it thru a paper filter so it’s not silty. Then go on YouTube and try out peoples recipes. Sometimes I try it with bottled spring water (water Profile makes a difference). Aero press can be had for cheap and filters are cheap too. It’s also going to outlast the zombie apocalypse (nonglass, great for travels). from there if you love espresso look at the flair, by then you should be great at keeping everything at the correct temperature and also getting the right grind with your current gear.
Oct 27, 2017
Warblerick
5
Oct 28, 2017
bookmark_border
Couldn't disagree more. If your coffee tastes burned from your Moka pot, you're doing something wrong. The only way to get a burned flavor would be leaving it on high for too long. If you follow instructions, it makes flawlessly perfect coffee every time, even with cheap coffee.
Oct 28, 2017
Dr.McCoy
344
Oct 28, 2017
bookmark_border
Perhaps - I've never owned a real Bialetti Moka Pot before so that may be a mitigating factor. I mean, the brand I got was good, but not the genuine article. My experience is mostly with other people's coffee here I gave mine away because I was using v60 and Aeropress every day. When I went for concentrated coffee I would do Turkish. So it just sat on my stove.
Oct 28, 2017
kingfisher
14
Nov 2, 2017
bookmark_border
I’ve found that burned coffee in a moka pot predictably occurs when the amount of ground is excessive. Of course, the size of the particles is important, too.
There has been very little if any discussion of scales, here. Since I started weighing my grounds, I’ve not had any trouble at all with burned coffee, either in the Moka or my La Pavoni. In the old Pavoni, I use 12 grams of ground. In the “3 cup” Moka, just twice that.
In both, I use the same grind. My Capresso conical burr grinder has sixteen settings for particle size. I’ve found the sweet spot to be four steps down from the finest (Turkish) setting.
Nov 2, 2017
Warblerick
5
Nov 2, 2017
bookmark_border
The Bialetti is far and away the simplest coffee maker I've ever used. It's not rocket science. You don't need to weigh your grounds, you don't need to overfill or pack them down. Just fill the funnel with your selected coffee, ground no finer than espresso grind, fill the pot with water to just below the valve, screw the top on tightly, set on your stove for about 7 minutes on high. When it starts to "chuff", turn it down to low for another minute or so, then remove from burner, open the lid, give it a stir, pour and enjoy. You guys are thinking too hard!
Nov 2, 2017
kingfisher
14
Nov 3, 2017
bookmark_border
I’ve only been using this thing for forty years. Thanks.
Nov 3, 2017
Warblerick
5
Nov 3, 2017
bookmark_border
I've only been using mine for maybe 6 months, but I haven't once burned ny coffee, or felt the need to weigh and measure out my grounds. Maybe I'm doing it wrong...
Nov 3, 2017
View Full Discussion