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njaysee
0
May 8, 2017
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is there a way to add a subwoofer to this ?
May 8, 2017
Kringler
6
May 11, 2017
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These are just two speakers with a typical 3.5mm port to connect to a device such as a computer, phone, or receiver. Depending on your setup, you could do whatever you want. I will say that I replaced a setup of mine that had a subwoofer with just these two speakers. The bass on them sounds very crisp, and has plenty of oomph.
May 11, 2017
njaysee
0
May 11, 2017
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The reason i asked is because i came from a 2.1 setup. And after many years of listening to a 2.1 setup (Harman Kardon Soundsticks 2), i felt that the bass in these speakers even though it is decent, but it is still lacking the fullness of a dedicated subwoofer.
I am not a very technical person thats why i am not sure if it is possible, i bought these when they were on sale.
The songs i listen to are classical, rock, pop, funk, jazz and blues.
That being said, these are truly a pair of very good speakers and i love them. I think they would be even better with a subwoofer, thats all. Thanks for your reply @Kringler
May 11, 2017
Kringler
6
May 11, 2017
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Depending on your setup, you could purchase a subwoofer that uses another 3.5mm jack. Most soundcards for a PC, and some USB soundcards will have four or five 3.5mm jacks for 5.1 or 7.1 surround sound. If you wanted to use these in a 2.1 (or better) setup, you'd just need to find the right subwoofer that will receive input from a 3.5mm jack.
For example, I use a Creative soundcard that has five 3.5mm jacks, and I can use as many or as few of those ports as I would like. I don't use a subwoofer currently, but if I wanted to, I could just pop it in and configure it on my driver.
May 11, 2017
njaysee
0
May 11, 2017
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Thanks for your explaination @Kringler !
May 11, 2017
Daed
571
May 12, 2017
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Where there's a will (and money), there's a way.
Most subwoofers I've owned (all but the one that came with my low-end Onkyo HTIB) have had their own crossover and line-level input. Some subs have their own output, too. In this case you could run the signal from the source to the sub, and then output from the sub to these speakers. That may filters the subwoofer frequencies out of the subsequent signal. Otherwise, you can use a 3.5mm splitter, and send one copy of the signal to the sub, and the other to these speakers.
You can also use another device which will process the signal and provide a subwoofer output, like some mixers and equalizers, but that would likely be a more expensive option.
May 12, 2017
Springy
20
Aug 8, 2017
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If you're looking to shake the house, Logitech has a speaker for you. If you want excellent quality audio at a reasonable price look no further. These speakers easil cover the full audio spectrum above 60 Hz and more than enough power and bass to make you hard of hearing and sound great while doing it.
Aug 8, 2017
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