Chinese Knives in 2019
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Looking around Drop I see some love and rather more hate for Chinese knives. It's one of those things where everyone's coming to the table from a slightly different direction and has their own reasons for feeling how they do. Not too many people are neutral on the topic. Sparks fly. Me? I'm a big white Midwesterner, born in a small-ass flyspeck of a town 20 miles south of the edge of nowhere. I've traveled some, but never to China; I've worked for Chinese businessmen, but only in the US; I don't speak the language beyond ordering food and I have about as many natural connections to the Chinese knife industry as I do to the man in the moon. I grew up seeing the cheapest things stamped 'Made in China' and knowing people who had fought, when they were younger, in the Korean War against Chinese 'volunteers'. (Which most of us learned about watching MASH.) To us, China was shady, an enemy, a punchline, a place where cheap BS got made, and if you would have asked me even as late as three years ago if any decent knives were made in China I might have still said no. I might have said 'maybe Taiwan. Not the mainland.' But I don't think I'd have ever said an unqualified yes. So that's where I'm coming from - the long way around. I'm just some dude that's been long since fed up with how lousy some things are made in our society, that one day stopped and took apart his $16 Chinese knife to see why it worked so well, and in the process began slowly but surely changing his mind about Chinese knives. If hearing that's enough that you're already prepared to disagree, and you're gearing up and you're just looking for something to rebut - don't worry. it's cool. I know I won't change your mind for the same reason that I'm the only one that could change mine. Most people don’t change their mind, period. How it is. But some of these facts might surprise you a little all the same... 1) Most Chinese knife makers got their start taking orders from Western firms, with whom they still directly work. A lot of them are OEMs for the Western firms and they make the very knives that they're later accused of ripping off. The deals are made with the understanding that after a noncompete period passes the OEM will be free to market their own variations of the design, within a set of constraints that both parties agreed to in negotiation before finalizing it in the contract. Western firms don't draw too much attention to this sort of thing. They know that by and large their market segments are different anyway. They also, it must be said, keep going back to these OEMs. The deals are lucrative. So while they're generally pleased to see that their fans see them as being victimized by their OEMs, they aren't victims. They're volunteers, and they're taking your money to the bank. 2) Chinese knives sold in the West are commissioned by Western brands as the cheapest priced offerings they plan to sell that year, and their quality level reflects it. You, as the consumer, are supposed to want something more expensive, no matter how expensive your thing already is. You're also supposed to think all Chinese work sucks. Even though you buy it. That's how captive markets work. It's the bottom tier of what's available to you in the store. That's also why when it's really a good piece of work, often you have to work hard to even be able to learn that it was made in China. That’s down to the importers, because they want more money for what they sell. To most folks, Chinese still means cheap. It's only been in the last couple years that the best Chinese names like Reate and WE Knife have had the chops to ask for and get Western pricing for their high quality knives. 3) China has a whole city in its most populous province devoted to pocket knife and scissors manufacture, and they have operated it around the clock since the 1990s. It's called Yangjiang and it's where the majority of Chinese knives are made. They encouraged knifemakers to move there and set up shop. How many cutlery manufacturers are there in Yangjiang? Over 1500. That's not a typo, the city has over one thousand five hundred factories making knives or parts for them. It's the Chinese Solingen. The cost of this investment from the Chinese government was more or less paid for a thousand times over by all the orders from the West it's fulfilled in those decades since. Some of those operations are content to just keep making cheap stuff, because it's what they do. And there's cheap startups that are essentially a building full of parts, stock, CNC machines and people with no secondary education or training in knives churning out knives made with boutique designs and materials but no craft. All that exists. But nowadays in Yangjiang, you also have a core residency of machinists and smiths and designers that know knives, that live and breathe them. Like we do. Like fat guys love pie. It's in the blood with these folks, their parents and sometimes their grandparents made knives. If you ask them what they do, they wouldn't say factory worker. they'd say craftsmen, you understand? They would not be wrong. They know about grinding. They know about heat treating. They know about ergonomics. And they don't want to do cheap work or be known for cheap work anymore. They want to make the best knives anyone can make, and their government has their back. (Google 'Made in China 2025' if you want to understand more about this.) 4) The majority of Chinese knives aren't even intended for Western markets, especially clones. And the people to whom those clones are marketed aren't people who were ever going to buy the original. We get outraged like it's all about us, and these knives are made to be snuck onto our own shelves in an elaborate bamboozle or something, but we only get them over here because enterprising people go get them and resell them in the West. IIRC only about 10% of Chinese branded knife production goes to the US. A large chunk of it goes to Eastern Europe, where Western brands aren’t established or are nalyevo. An increasingly larger piece of it stays in Asia to feed the demands of the new and growing Asian middle class economies. At times like this it's worth remembering that in terms of world population, every seventh person on Earth is quite literally a Chinese farmer, and those people aren't ever gonna buy the original Sebenza. The guy who wanted to buy a Sebenza to impress all his coworkers and buddies isn't going to go 'wait, I have a better idea, I'll impress them more with this $14 version'. And one more point: as many Western designs as the Chinese appropriated without paying for them? They have a ways to go before they catch up to the number of times Western designs have been used by Western companies without properly paying the designer, because of some contractual sleight of law. Let’s not forget that. So while the theory's fine, in practice a lot of the outrages about 'clones' end up being about as victimless a crime as home grown doob. It's what comes up when people discuss their issues with China, because people feel that talking about cloning and intellectual property won't get them accused of racism or whatever, and talking about other things might. The truth is, we usually don't like or dislike things for deep, meaningful, rationally well thought out reasons that we can reliably translate into words when someone asks. Babies like and dislike things. The process really doesn't mature all that much. We just pretend it has. And when you point out a few problems about the outrage over the knife ‘cloning’ issue, it generally doesn’t dissuade the outraged. 5) That's because it's not really about cloning or property rights for most folks. They see that as something that is wrong, not THE thing that is wrong. And folks don’t want to say what THE thing is, out loud, but it's pretty simple to understand: they feel threatened by the Chinese. The only real cultural analogue for this in the American social consciousness is war, which folks run with in their minds and share their words, because they feel an existential threat from the Chinese worker. It's all over their TV, it's what they talk about, they feel like China is a threat to them and many, many people they care about. It's one of the reasons some folks will never in a million years agree to anything I'm saying here -- they'd find it disloyal to their peers and to their kinfolk who used to work in factories that long ago shut down and moved production overseas. It's a social issue. And you know what? Misplaced as I might find it in this case, I respect honor. I get it. Like I keep saying, I don't expect to change anyone's mind. There's just one thing I want to ask you: all those shuttered American factories and workers out of their job.... you know how many of them got closed down because the Chinese came in, bought up and shut down, threw all the skilled laborers out of work, stole their retirement, hauled off everything of value, and went and set up shop back in China so they could make a killing selling us the things we used to make? Folks, this is important -- that has happened zero times. The Chinese, a Communist foreign power and the most likely nation to displace the US one day as the world's greatest superpower, our economic competitors and occasional battlefield enemy, the 'Red Chinese Menace' still never once did that to us. Neither did the Mexicans, neither did the Canadians. How'd those factories shut down? That was all Americans. Our own people. Remember back in the 90s all that stuff about the WTO? That was us. 'Downsizing', 'offshoring', and 'outsourcing'? That was us too. 'Service economy'? Yup -- us. "International supply chain" - us, with bells on. And we let ourselves get away with it, because whenever anyone objected the wealthy trotted out practiced 'free market' arguments, as though these markets are really free anymore, and not largely controlled by a comparative handful of unspeakably wealthy people born from old money and new industry, who were making an absolute filthy killing in the modern marketplace. And made it seem like the people who wanted to keep their jobs were just backwards, and needed to go off to college and learn how to be a software engineer instead. Now here we are, with large social groups of people, majority and minority, who feel like they can't get a job and they don't have a safety cushion. Your friends. My friends. There's a lot of rage. And it keeps people from looking around for the man behind the curtain or the large bag in his hands, which happens to be full of all the money everyone else is missing. And we want someone to blame for it. Enter the Chinese. But the truth is if you buy a SRM or one of the affiliated brand names, or a Ganzo, or a TwoSun or any of the other Chinese brands that are trying to establish themselves in the West, and you open it up and look inside - really look at it -- you're going to see what I saw. And if, like me, you at the time had no particular reason to believe it until you saw it, it's probably going to be a little disconcerting. The build quality and parts are not just a little better than anything the Western brands provide on their budget models (invariably cheap white nylon washers). They're way better than that. Because you literally have to buy and take apart a midtech knife to find better than the sort of washers on a $16 SRM knife. And it goes onto the more expensive knives. If you open up a $25 SRM instead of a $16 one? You find caged ceramic bearings running in milled pockets in the blade. Up and down the cost spectrum they're adding value. Once you see it you can't unsee it. Our manufacturers have been selling us short for a while now, by comparison. They figure a wink is as good as a nod to the blind man. So yeah nowadays this loyal and patriotic American owns a lot of damned good Chinese knives (and a few shitty ones that snuck through the wire....I suggest avoiding Eafengrow, OerLa, WTT, Canku and Albatross in general). I'm happier for that. My Sanrenmus and Ganzos and Harnds and TwoSuns sit right alongside my US knives and UK knives and Spanish knives and Italian knives and German knives and Japanese knives, Nepalese knives, Swedish knives, Pakistani knives, El Salvadoran knives, South African knives, Filipino knives, Finnish knives, French knives. Even got a Swiss knife someplace. They’re knives. I buy them. There are limits. There's still plenty of junky knives coming out of China and I do a little research before I check out a new manufacturer. I seek out proven manufacturers when buying and avoid third parties whenever possible unless they're large enough to be held accountable. I won't buy an outright clone because even I can recognize in that case there's a meaningful property rights issue. That's money I can see coming out of the designer's pocket. But I'm ok going with legal definitions of different. So long as it's made of what it says it's made of, and there's visible design differences and it's got the maker's real logo on it, no fake logos, the law generally doesn't consider it to be a counterfeit item. If we've got that and it's well made, I could honestly GAF if it resembles a wildly successful Western knife. Chances are good I own that one too. By most standards my knife collection is modest but you'd still have to hunt pretty hard to find a US knifemaker who could gripe about my buying habits. If someone can build me something solid and true in this day and age of perfidy and bullshit ephemera, coming from every direction? I’m interested. To me, that's its own honesty. That's where I come out on this. How about you?
(Edited)
thumb_upgoorgle, Usergrade, and 97 others
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Usergrade
46
Nov 30, 2019
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I'd really like to go and read all the comments right now, but I'm back in school after a decade and a half and as the semester is coming to an end, I really need to stop going down internet holes and show up all these 20 year olds making me feel ancient. So I'll be back, but I just wanted to drop in for a second and complment you on a well written and well thought out post on an issue that can both inflame emotions and irrationally reinforce or engender opinions that are unnecessarily divisive. You state your case with intelligence and forethought, with a gentle tone to (at least try to) ensure your ideas are heard. Well done, and thank you for taking the time. I own a handful of knives and would like to make a hobby of it, but being in school it's cost prohibitive at the moment. I also restore vintage fountain pens, so I'm looking forward to the tinkering - and the idea of having some quality stuff to learn on that won't break the bank is awesome. It's hard to sort through all the Chinese brands as well, so thanks for the suggestion of companies to start with. Thanks again, josh
Nov 30, 2019
reswright
886
Nov 29, 2019
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Rike Alien 2, N690Co/Ti I'm just going to leave these pictures here.
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Nov 29, 2019
DougFLA123
1209
Nov 30, 2019
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That is one cool looking karambit! The font used for the engraving looks excellent and “Alice 2” makes it very unique!
Nov 30, 2019
reswright
886
Dec 3, 2019
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it's an odd way to pick up a one of a kind piece but hey
Dec 3, 2019
reswright
886
Nov 25, 2019
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TwoSun TS222 14C28N Sandvik/G-10 Speaking of cool grinds:
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Carry on :)
Nov 25, 2019
reswright
886
Nov 22, 2019
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Real Steel Knives

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Real Steel Knives (or RSK) has had a couple Drops since I've been here. Before then, I had very little info about them -- I had a Black Cat II and had heard that the Blue Sheep was a helluva knife, but that was about it. The short version is they were started by the same folks that did San Ren Mu, and in addition to their house line of RSK they do a lot of OEM work and there's a decent chance you've already handled some of it unknowningly. OEMs are usually not allowed to advertise to consumers that they made such and such a knife as the original equipment manufacturer for Company X. But after buying many, taking them apart and learning about them I can tell you a few things about RSK. The short version is that RSK is the real deal. Build quality starts off strong with the budget tier knives like the Blue Sheep and the Gerfalcon and the Horus -- all very high for budget work, I'd say on a par with the Spyderco work done in Seki City in Japan -- and then progresses up the ladder to a modest number of $150-300 knives that are all put together extremely well. Their best knife is arguably the Harrier, with bank vault bearings and a tandem detent system that throws a lot of people who aren't used to it off -- it feels less like a detent catch and more like machinery engaging, and is legitimate midtech. Their latest high end offering is a M390 and pull and peel CF with titanium fittings version of the Metamorph by Ostap Hel, which is quite a bit like an Aston Martin in that it's beautiful, high performance, with a top notch design but if you aren't careful behind the wheel it'll bite you. Wicked, wicked front flipper, not for beginners or or fidgeters. If that sounds alarming to you, they've even got a new slip joint for you folks who hanker for the 19th century way of doing stuff, I think it's called the Luna. Not really my thing but it looks well made. The knife community is already catching on to this build quality -- anyone who tried to pick up a Pelican or a Sidus with copper shred CF last month can tell you that much. Bearing knives are getting common but RSK brings a whole new level to it to it -- they don't just have the standard ceramic bearings, they have thrust bearings, needle bearings, really cool tech. The Griffin is seriously about the baddest ass $50 plunge lock in existence. Real Steel is giving the likes of Reate and even WE some competition in the quality department. The export manager for RSK has been known to hang out on this forum on occasion as @Realsteel12. If he's listening, I think a conventional flipping version of the CF and M390 Metamorph, like the variant they put out on the S class in Ti and S35VN, would sell like gangbusters as a Drop exclusive. I know I'd buy it. :)
Nov 22, 2019
Realsteel12
2
Nov 22, 2019
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Listening, and paying avid attention. I have to agree with you on the Harrier, structurally and technically speaking it is our best knife, in the price range however - this is not a cheap knife, and because of this not a lot of people are willing to fork out the money for it. If you were to ask me what our best knife is I would say the S5 Metamorph standard flipper version. I do really enjoy the front flipper as you can see from my own green 'limited' edition (that I have not taken the best care of). But the feel and action of this knife is priceless. That being said I do also carry a Mora Eldris ;)
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As for OEM work, we do do a lot, yet we like to keep this quiet unlike other Chinese OEM manufacturers, this is mainly so we can focus on the Real Steel brand, however OEM work is something that we very much enjoy doing, and as you rightly mentioned, a lot of people have most likely handled a Real Steel manufactured knife without even knowing it. There is one important point I would like to clear up regarding Sanrenmu. Sanrenmu and Real Steel are two entities, and not connected. We indeed know the guys over at Sanrenmu, but have no other affiliation with them other than they are a Chinese company, and we are also a Chinese company. This misinterpretation was a problem of some poor brand marketing when we first started out - the message back in 2013 was 'we are the overseas version of Sanrenmu'. The main reason behind this was to give Real Steel a name for itself as quickly as possible. As the brand developed this marketing mistake followed us everywhere - even today ;) Our brand mission now is to provide the knife market with the most flexible custom service, in terms of MOQ and choices. We have a large number of custom Real Steel 'custom' knives on going for dealers throughout the globe. One of them you have in the G5 M390. Yet, this is just the tip of the iceberg however. 
Nov 22, 2019
reswright
886
Nov 22, 2019
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" This misinterpretation was a problem of some poor brand marketing when we first started out - the message back in 2013 was 'we are the overseas version of Sanrenmu'. The main reason behind this was to give Real Steel a name for itself as quickly as possible. As the brand developed this marketing mistake followed us everywhere - even today ;) " Ok, that explains it. I knew I had read something along the lines of 'we are the overseas version of SRM' and heard it too many places to think it was just a spontaneous association between two similar brands. To be fair there's more to the comparison, like the commonality of beta-plus framelocks, and the E77 vis a vis the SRM 9054 and accompanying Land model being close variations of the same knife, that probably lead people to associate the two brands. For what it's worth, your work even looks very similar under the microscope, down to the engravature. But that sort of convergent activity happens in Western knife brands too. Ah, well, you know how it is -- Chinese companies keep their details largely to themselves, a circumspection that naturally engenders Western speculation.
Nov 22, 2019
reswright
886
Nov 19, 2019
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Tuya Envy II, M390/Ti This is @DW1Tuya work. There's a lot I could say about how light it is, and how solid it is, and how sharp it is and how well it flips, and that's all true, but more than that, this knife just looks like it's at least +3 straight out of the box. Seriously, just look at the grind on this thing:
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Tuyaknife is a high quality operation and they're worth your time if you're interested in really well made knives with an American design ethic. It's about impossible to get an original Envy now, but the Envy II stands on its own two feet and shows some serious pride in craftsmanship while still keeping things properly understated -- elegant instead of attention-grabbing. And if that compound grind doesn't make you smile a little, you and I are very different folks when it comes to knives. Me, I very much dig it. Flat, deep hollow, and swedge -- what's not to love? There's very little a design like this won't cut, but hollow ground slicers often see damage toward the tip where the blade thins out and lots of torque gets placed on the cutting edge by the force of using the knife. By flat grinding the tip and moving the hollow grind back a skosh, Tuya skips that entirely -- and incidentally creates a lovely visual effect. The upside is that this knife will slice like a slicer but pierce a lot more like a utility blade. I really wish Drop would source some Tuyas. I've been bugging them for it for quite a while now. They're bad ass knives. And it's not just me, there's even a couple of threads where people asked for them. If the nature of the deal is such that it woudn't work for Drop, fine -- but someone could say that, and then it wouldn't feel like we're all being ignored. Food for thought, @kstokley and @han.
Nov 19, 2019
reswright
886
Nov 20, 2019
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Right on, man. @kstokley: this is good to see! I look forward to hearing more. Word to the wise: y’all will have a hard time holding onto the Tuya samples if you leave them out on your desk.
Nov 20, 2019
BigBuckNutz
8
Dec 3, 2019
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Good stuff going on here. Really excited to see what comes from a Tuya/Drop collaboration. Just scored my first two Tuya knives (a Cebu and a Shuriken) over the weekend and hope to have them in hand in a few days. I’m sure they’ll be great as reswright’s insights haven’t steered me wrong yet.
Dec 3, 2019
reswright
886
Nov 13, 2019
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Harnds Assassin, 14C28N/G-10, version 2 (with clip) TL;DR inexpensive, good steel, impressive handfeel and flipping speed, light, well balanced work from one of Boker and CRKTs OEMs. Now with a pocket clip. If Drop can source them under $40 I think this knife would have a lot of fans here.
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Longer version: I first learned of this brand a while ago, when I picked up one of their pocket knives -- the original Assassin. I loved it, thought it was an excellent value, but wouldn't pocket it because it didn't have a clip. I left a review on the place I bought it from, saying as much. to my surprise the owner reached out to me and said they'd chosen to leave off the clip because the designer thought the clip would clutter things up. Told me that they'd had a return on another kind of knife, which turned out to be the Talisman, and if I didn't mind he'd like to send it to me for free, see if I liked it better. I ended up not liking it better than the Assassin, but I still liked the second knife, and started adding Harnds to my collection. Harnds is Hong Kong Chinese, and a lot of the material they source is Japanese - where many Chinese manufacturers might use domestically produced 8Cr13MoV steel, for example, Harnds is as likely to use Aichi AUS 8 -- nobody's super steel, but still a recognized step up from the 8Cr steels that are its knockoffs. But the thing that struck me more is that where a lot of Chinese knives have eye popping CNCed blades and handles and are catching the consumer's attention with a cool looking design, that the Harnds focus was surprisingly utilitarian -- on handfeel and balance. It's not necessarily easy to see, it's not sexy and salesy like laser cut doohickeys and whatnot, but it's professional. That's what I dug the most: they seemed like they were trying to sell more knives by making GOOD ones, and not just making ones people might pick out of a catalog. Having integrity. The lost art, know what I mean? So, the Assassin. Probably so named for the longer, thin blade profile, although I dare say you wouldn't want to get gaffed by this thing. Actually decent in the all around in terms of daily use, though, the blade shape.
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The blade flips sweetly for a long bladed knife.
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The satin Sandvik has a nice, fine grain to it. It did not come honed, but it did come quite sharp:
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This isn't a CNCed blade. It's a blank that someone ground in a knife shop, using large tools and their hands. Fairly well. "So what?" many people might say. "The CNC would probably be better and more precise!" And they're actually right, but miss the point -- when it comes to Chinese knives, some are made by people who know knives, and some are made by people pushing buttons on CNC machines. You'll see these knives that have fantastic work in the blade and handle, but the lock barely grabs the lock face and it's hard to flip the knife open and a lot of other stuff, because at the end of the day instead of a knife designer making a knife it's just a guy who knows how to run autoCAD software and knows what knives look like as a general rule. So one of the things you look for is whether a company also knows what they're doing, not just whether the knife looks cool. And these were made competently. Take the lockup. You have tremendous contact, which usually means a strong lockbar spring, which usually means a lot of detent pressure which makes for a grating flip. But the Assassin flips effortlessly and locks up reliably, like this:
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Looking closer:
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That's pretty damned good. Zero rock, zero blade play, no unfinished edges, hand finished, everything's professional. People who like a longer, thinner pocket knife are going to be really pleased at how this flips and fits the hand. I'm kinda tickled that they added the clip to this knife. A lot of folks must have said the same thing, but still. Hell, that's a lot more than a lot of American companies do when people complain. I'm gonna have to email that dude and tell him it's right on target. Hope he's still in one piece.
Nov 13, 2019
reswright
886
Nov 5, 2019
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Land 910T2, M390/Titanium I've spoken at length about my love of the Land 910 already in this thread, and won't waste your time reintroducing it. Amazing knife for the price, stainless and Sandvik. I dig it immensely, and I (and a whole lot of other people as well), have gone on the record saying what we REALLY want is a Land 910 in titanium and super steel. Enter the 910T2.
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Here's the short version: If you can find one, and you are right handed? Get it.
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Why right handed? It is almost exactly the same as the regular 910 in design, except for one thing: the clip on the 910T2 is not reversible.
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Why do I say 'if you can find it?' Because I've only seen it available shipped from China by individual resellers. I don't know if it's been made available to America yet.
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I dunno if Drop would ever source these, because of the similarity to the Sebenza, but they should, and if they do, I heartily recommend you picking one up.
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Because it's all that :)
Nov 5, 2019
reswright
886
Nov 4, 2019
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Rike Knife So I'm a big fan of the new Chinese knives, right? And by that I mean I'm a fan of their quality of manufacture. I've discovered a number of brands -- everyone by now has heard of WE Knife and Reate, a lot of folks know about Bestech and Kizer, some know about TwoSun and Ganzo - but I was very pleased to run across brands like San Ren Mu, and Real Steel, and Harnds that were making amazing knives at a decent price. Well, as of late, my favorite knifemaker isn't any of these, or US stalwarts like Benchmade or Emerson or Spyderco. It's Rike Knife, which is a up and coming brand run by a designer named Richard Wu. Rike has a range of products and many of them have been sold on Drop, ranging from mini knives like the Hummingbird to huge honking knives like the Knight. I haven't found a bad one yet. My favorites, though, hands down, have got to be the M series. I've got two of them so far -- the M1, at the bottom below, titanium, M390 and one hell of a wicked design, is a straight flipper knife. The M3 on top is more like Rike's take on an Emerson Wave knife -- like Emersons it has the metal and G10 scales, the blade is 154CM, it even has a serial number, and of course in addition to the flip tab you can open it by catching that lip on top of the blade on the edge of your pocket as you pull the knife from it. Basically you're letting the motion of your draw open your blade. It takes a little practice at first, but once you get used to it it's a more fast and reliable open than even a switchblade offers.
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Drop is now offering the M2 for $200, which is a significant discount -- the cheapest I've seen them elsewhere is $250 at ketuousa.com. Based on my experience and having read a ton of reviews and discussion on Drop for past Rike Knife drops, there's a chance that Drop's M2s may have blemishes or other minor defects to them, and that's why they can be had for a discount. For example, the anodization on my M3, also purchased from Drop, ended up not being quite as stellar looking as it looked in the ads. If you're worried about that, save a little more dough up and buy it from an authorized reseller. Me, I tend to be forgiving of such things when the rest of the knife is so bomb diggity awesome. I care about looks but care much more about function. And the truth is, I think my M3 is currently my favorite knife, even though I have knives that cost much, much more. As a wave knife, it's superior to my Emerson -- and that's saying a whole lot. Why? The flip on it, and on the M1, are mid-tech smooth, like someone who REALLY knows their stuff did the final tuning on the knife. This knife fits my hand like it was made for it, and when you deploy it using the wave it flips open like someone spent 20 years balancing it. It just works brilliantly. But more than that, you can see a lot of insane designs on Chinese knives these days and when you go to handle the knife it's more of a 'meh, what were they thinking?" But this design works with your hand. It's amazingly well executed. If you like a bit of thumb ramp I'd suggest the M1 or the M3 over the M2 as it's the one of the three that lacks that feature. It's got jimping but the spine's straight, it doesn't raise to meet your thumb when you try gripping it that way. Me, I'm a fan of a little bit of thumb ramping. If Rike isn't on your radar, it should be.
Nov 4, 2019
reswright
886
Nov 2, 2019
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Recent additions.
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Nov 2, 2019
reswright
886
Oct 24, 2019
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Some guys tie flies. Some guys fly Thai. Some guys buy lies. I dye my knives.
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Oct 24, 2019
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