Topping A30 Pro Headphone Amplifier

Topping A30 Pro Headphone Amplifier

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Product Description
It’s taken Topping nearly 4 years to release a successor to the highly regarded A30 headphone amplifier. With marked improvements in output power, input options, and noise reduction, the A30 Pro has been worth the wait Read More

Next-Gen, No-Noise Headphone Amplification

It’s taken Topping nearly 4 years to release a successor to the highly regarded A30 headphone amplifier. With marked improvements in output power, input options, and noise reduction, the A30 Pro has been worth the wait. Capable of outputting an impressive 6 watts per channel at 16 ohms, 5.5 watts at 32 ohms, and 820 milliwatts at 300 ohms, the power-loaded Pro can easily drive any pair of headphones. Best of all, it can do so with no noise. Its THD + N rating of 0.00006-percent is among the best in its class, while its onboard ground lift switch eliminates ground loop noise instantly. Equipped with UHGF (ultra high gain feedback) technology and an NFCA-based circuit, the A30 Pro also boasts 145 decibels of dynamic range—plus a three-stage gain selector. Connect to a host of single-ended and balanced inputs (with bypass when powered off) to bring your headphones to life. 

Topping A30 Pro Headphone Amplifier
Topping A30 Pro Headphone Amplifier
Topping A30 Pro Headphone Amplifier
Topping A30 Pro Headphone Amplifier

Model

Specs

 General

  • Topping
  • Output power: 6 W x 2 (16 ohms, THD+N <0.1%); 5,500 mW x 2 (32 ohms, THD+N <0.1%); 840 mW x 2 (300 ohms, THD+N <0.1%)
  • Inputs: XLR (left and right), RCA 
  • Outputs: 4-pin XLR, 4.4 mm, 6.35 mm
  • Bypass output (when power off)
  • Passthrough outputs: 6.35mm TRS (left and right), RCA
  • THD+N: < 0.00006%
  • Noise: < 0.3 uVrms
  • Power: 100 – 240 VAC, 50 Hz / 60 Hz
  • Gain settings: Low (-14 dB), Medium (0 dB), High (+14 dB)
  • Power consumption: < 9 W
  • Adapter impedance: > 8 ohms
  • Weight: 1.9 lbs (0.87 kg)
  • Dimensions: 6.85 x 5.4 x 1.7 in (17.4 x 13.8 x 4.5 cm)

Single-Ended Input

  • THD + N (1 kHz A-weighted): <0.00007% (3.5 W, 32 ohms); <0.00006% (90 mW, 300 ohms)
  • THD (20 Hz – 20 kHz, 90 kBW): <0.00008% (760 mW, 32 ohms); <0.00007% (81 mW, 300 ohms)
  • SNR (maximum output, 1kHz A-weighted): 145 dB
  • SNR (50 mV output, 1kHz): 104 dB
  • Dynamic range (1 kHz A-weighted): 145 dB
  • Frequency response: 20 Hz – 40,000 Hz (± 0.05 dB)
  • Output level: 34 Vpp (low gain), 34 Vpp (medium gain), 45 Vpp (high gain)
  • AP-measured noise level (A-weighted): < 0.7 uVrms (low gain), 0.7 uVrms (medium gain), 1.2 uVrms (high gain)
  • Actual noise level: < 0.3 uVrms (low gain), < 0.3 uVrms (medium gain), < 0.9 uVrms (high gain)
  • Channel crosstalk (1 kHz): -106 dB
  • IMD CCIF (18 kHz + 19 kHz): -116 dB
  • IMD SMPTE (60 Hz + 7 kHz): -110 dB (SMPTE 4:1), -115 dB (SMPTE 1:1)
  • Input sensitivity: 60 Vrms (low gain), 12.6 Vrms (medium gain), 2.7 Vrms (high gain)
  • Gain: -14 dB (low gain), 0 dB (medium gain), 14 dB (high gain)
  • Output impedance: < 0.1 ohms

Balanced Input

  • THD + N (1 kHz A-weighted): <0.00007% (3.2 W, 32 ohms), <0.00006%  (86 mW, 300 ohms)
  • THD (20 Hz – 20 kHz, 90 kBW): <0.00008% (760 mW, 32 ohms), <0.00007% (81 mW, 300 ohms)
  • SNR (maximum output, 1kHz A-weighted): 140dB
  • SNR (50 mV output, 1kHz): 104 dB
  • Dynamic range (1 kHz A-weighted): 140 dB
  • Frequency response: 20 Hz – 40,000 Hz (± 0.1 dB)
  • Output level: 6.6 Vpp (low gain), 34 Vpp (medium gain), 45 Vpp (high gain)
  • AP-measured noise level (A-weighted): < 0.7 uVrms (low gain), < 0.7 uVrms (medium gain), 1.2 uVrms (high gain)
  • Actual noise level: < 0.3 uVrms (low gain), < 0.3 uVrms (medium gain), < 1.1 uVrms (high gain)
  • Channel crosstalk (1 kHz): -101 dB
  • IMD CCIF (18 kHz + 19 kHz): -116 dB
  • IMD SMPTE (60 Hz + 7 kHz): -110 dB (SMPTE 4:1), -116 dB (SMPTE 1:1)
  • Input sensitivity: 12.7 Vrms (low gain), 12.7 Vrms (medium gain), 2.7 Vrms (high gain)
  • Gain: -14 dB (low gain), 0 dB (medium gain), 14 dB (high gain)
  • Output impedance: < 0.1 ohms

Manufacturer’s Note

  • The actual noise level is obtained by boosting the noise of the A30 Pro by 40 dB using a low noise amplifier in front of the APx555B and then dividing the measured noise by 100 times

Included

  • AC power cable
  • 6.35 mm to 3.5 mm adaptor
  • Owner’s manual

Shipping

All orders will be shipped by Drop.

Estimated ship date is May 13, 2021 PT.

Payment will be collected at checkout. After this product run ends, orders will be submitted to the vendor up front, making all orders final.

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Recent Activity
In my opinion, good measurement is an essential way to ensure the quality of audio equipment (,in this case, Amplifier). They will, for most of the time, honestly reflect the overall performance of the instrument. I know you might disagree. But I think you were not reasoning on anything but only bringing up your statement. (hmm I hate to see "WOULD KNOW" without any reasoning). So let me make my point clear by bringing up some arguments. If you find my conclusion unreasonable, you should argue against these statements or the logics. Let's first find some consensus: Audio equipment is about preserving information of sound, that is, recording and reproducing it. The job of amps are to amplify analog signals, which is in the form of electric current, both input and output. An ideal amplification means ONLY increasing the magnitude of electric signal and NOT disturbing the characteristics of the signal: That means firstly the amplification is a BIJECTIVE function (both injective and surjective), so it is not losing information. Secondly it is a LINEAR function, so it is not distorting information. 4. Almost all measurement tests are done on the basic jobs of the amplifiers. They are measured to ensure the bijection and linearity mentioned above. So it will honestly reflect on how the same job will be handled by the same unit. 5. By setting an ideal measurement on the LARGE VARIETY of tests, we are making sure the amplification performance in reality will not defer too much from the measurement. In its feature space (or say dimensions), different tests set will restrict on problems that could go wrong in real world. Thus the least we can say is that a good amplifier MUST be a great performer in the tests. A bad amplifier might be a great performer in the tests since we only covered specific dimensions of the amplification jobs. But it is very unlikely since the tests are carefully selected to cover the most important aspects of the equipment performance. Also need to mention that a lot of test statistics are already generalizations of high dimensional data. So we can conclude a "measurement box" is not merely a measurement box, it is a reliable audio reproduction equipment.