Massdrop x Dan Durston X-Mid 1P Tent
Massdrop x Dan Durston X-Mid 1P Tent
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Product Description
Designed to be the best double-wall solo shelter supported by trekking poles, the X-Mid is the brainchild of Dan Durston, an experienced thru-hiker and established member of the ultralight community. It aims to solve the common issues seen in trekking-pole-supported tents: Most are single-trekking-pole pyramids, which lack headroom, or overly complex multi-pole designs, which are tedious to pitch Read More

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kyler1945
7
Jul 7, 2020
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Any update on shipment of the batch scheduled for late July?
Jul 7, 2020
dandurston
3440
Dan Durston
Jul 8, 2020
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Not sure exactly but they seem to be roughly on track. Likely to ship out pretty close to the estimated date (eg. Within a few days)
Jul 8, 2020
djbraide
2
Jul 1, 2020
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Hi Dan, I think you've got a tremendous tent here. One small point, I live in the UK where wild camping is not allowed, we have to be stealthy, are there any plans for a dark green option please? Glad to see solid inners will be introduced soon and in all other respects the tent looks ideal for our wet and windy conditions. Congratulations. John
Jul 1, 2020
djbraide
2
Jul 1, 2020
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Hi Dan, Thanks for your comprehensive reply. We have to be careful not to draw attention to ourselves so darker shades of green brown or grey work best but I appreciate it's a small market. Wild camping in Scotland is permitted and farmers there are very relaxed about it but in England and Wales they are not too keen. A lot depends on pitch selection but I used a Scarp for some years without a problem. I don't think it's a deal breaker so I'll follow your site and order one when the solid inner becomes available. I have a sil-poly tent and really value it's non stretch and shake dry properties. In the UK the tent gets wet on the first night and stays wet for the whole trip. John
Jul 1, 2020
dandurston
3440
Dan Durston
Jul 6, 2020
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Hi Fred, Good luck with those 6 section poles. Sounds nice. For the camo patterns, I realize that a lot of people like camo, but there's also a lot of people that don't due to camo being associated with hunting. I could see camo making sense to offer but I'd likely do that as part of a 3 color lineup (bright, subtle, and camo). That would be nice to do, but currently I don't think we're in a position to offer more than 1 color so I prefer to stick with the current subtle shade that works pretty well for everyone. I appreciate the kind offer to make a camo pattern, and will keep it in mind in case we are in a position to expand the color options in the future.
Jul 6, 2020
NoVaGator
7
Jun 27, 2020
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Looking forward to getting the tent. Its maiden voyage will be 5 days in the depths of the Grand Canyon in November.
Jun 27, 2020
Uncle_Fred
11
Jun 26, 2020
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Hi Dan, I'm looking for a new carbon Fiber tent pole but noticed ruta locura is out of stock. Tried to order one from Six Moons but the shipping to Canada is as costly as the product itself. Is there any other options for quality sectional carbon Fibre tent poles?
Jun 26, 2020
dandurston
3440
Dan Durston
Jun 29, 2020
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A nice option if you're handy is to built your own set using the carbon fiber pole sections sold here: https://www.questoutfitters.com/Tent_Poles_CF.htm Those Easton 6.3 poles are the same poles as Six Moon Designs is using but in exchange for hacksawing them to the appropriate length and adding the shockcord and end caps yourself, you save on the price. You can built a 4 or 5 section pole, but 5 is nicer because it packs shorter like the tent. To do that, you need 4 sections with insert and 1 last section without, so in total you need these parts:
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Total cost is about $40 USD for two poles, whereas SMD is $40 each. Quest Outfitters has good shipping to Canada (their prices are a bit high but they usually cost less and then they refund you the differences).
Jun 29, 2020
Amariah
1
Jun 24, 2020
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I'm a new-er and small backpacker who is hoping to reduce pack weight where I can. I'm trying to decide between the 1p and the 2p for me(5'8 and 110lbs) and my dog (80lbs). Although my dog is fine curling up at my feet or snuggling at night, I am concerned about touching the sides of the tent since we're on vanc. Island and it rains/is humid often. The vestibule is, unfortunately, not possible with a protective and prey-driven dog. Any insight or advice is appreciated! Thank you!
(Edited)
Jun 24, 2020
dandurston
3440
Dan Durston
Jun 24, 2020
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Nice to hear you're on Vancouver Island. I lived there for a few years and have hiked some of the classic areas like Strathcona, Carmanah-Walbran, Juan de Fuca, Cape Scott etc. Normally it is quite unlikely to have the inner touch the fly with the 1P because the fly material doesn't sag in the rain like most tents (it's polyester instead of nylon that most tents use), and because the gaps between the inner and fly are larger than average at 6-8" (versus 4-5" typically). So unless the pitch is poor or you're really pushing on the inner walls, it won't touch. With that said, it's hard to say how well your 80 lbs dog would fit. I'm 6'0" and have used the 1P with my 15 lbs dog (see below). There's not much extra space, but if you had a shorter pad (e.g. Thermrest makes some 66" pads that would free up another 6") then you probably could fit a larger dog in there as long as the dog was more of a cuddler and not an active sleeper. Hard to say for sure but hopefully that atleast helps.
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Jun 24, 2020
regis101
73
Jun 24, 2020
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That's a red fox. You trying to kid us er what ?
Jun 24, 2020
onmoviesv9.1
0
Jun 23, 2020
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RyanMacG
7
Jun 23, 2020
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Would something like these https://www.blacks.co.uk/equipment/324745-hi-gear-tarp-telescopic-pole-230-cm.html work in place of trekking poles for bikepacking purposes?
Jun 23, 2020
RyanMacG
7
Jun 23, 2020
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Amazing thanks!
Jun 23, 2020
Wyattboehm6
0
Jun 23, 2020
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What do you think the chance of the tent getting delivered before, or on, July 24? I have a week long backpacking trip that I am leaving for on that day.
(Edited)
Jun 23, 2020
LukasM
898
Collaborations
Jul 4, 2020
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We sold out of all the July units available, the next shipment in September is now available for purchase.
Jul 4, 2020
Iainm
0
Jul 4, 2020
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Thanks Lukas.
Jul 4, 2020
regis101
73
Jun 20, 2020
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I'm proud to say that I own one of these tents. It's actually pitched out in the yard right now getting some sun. It's still remarkable to me the ease of pitching, the innovation of design, the attention to construction detail and the smile it brings to my face. Small backstory. I've been playing with tarps also out in the yard to help pass time. Getting used to the origami aspect. I might do some tarp camping/hiking this year. Part two. Today I get an email that another vendor is finally able to release one of their tent models starting tomorrow. Admittedly, my finger has been cramped up over the Buy button for awhile. So. After putting the tarp(s) away, I break out the X-Mid. Killed two minutes seventeen seconds setting it up. Stood back. There's that smile again. Sheesh. How could I possibly think of buying another tent. That's it. That's my story. Gonna go now. Gonna go mess around with a kick ass X-Mid, even if it is just in the yard.
Jun 20, 2020
dandurston
3440
Dan Durston
Jun 22, 2020
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Thanks for the story Regis. Glad you're liking the X-Mid!
Jun 22, 2020
Jerseyhiker
3
Jun 19, 2020
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I'm so excited that the ship date of these is coming up! Kudos Dan - your effort and ingenuity have paid off in what looks to be an amazing product! Your involvement in comments and comparisons to competitors tents on the market are what led to my decision to pre-order the x-mid.

One question I did have that I haven't seen covered to much in the posts is in regards to the choice of polyester vs Sil-nylon? I know that Poly doesn't retain water or stretch out as much when wet, which is why you went with a Poly construction. I have found though that poly does tend to tear easier than nylon and was wondering how much that weighed into your choice of material or what precautions were taken in the production in light of that? Not that I'm speaking a future rip into existence - I was just looking to see if you had any insight into the production process or ideas of how to safeguard against tears (if that should even be a concern with the x-mid's particular construction).

Jun 19, 2020
dandurston
3440
Dan Durston
Jun 19, 2020
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As you mention, polyester has advantages of not absorbing water weight and not expanding when wet. The latter is a major advantage because nylon expands 3-4% when wet, which is a lot (e.g. that's 6" of loose fabric over the arch of a tent). For a traditional poled tent that means wrinkly fabric and perhaps the fly sticking to the inner, whereas with a trekking pole tent that a bigger problem because the canopy is part of the tent's structure (e.g. nylon becomes structurally unsound as it sags). The water weight advantage is important too because poly doesn't absorb water into the fibers, while nylon does and which can add 1/2 lbs pretty easily to the tents weight and make it slow to dry. Polyester is rapidly rising in popularity since the debut of the X-Mid, with many companies now offering poly tents (e.g. Six Moon Designs, Black Diamond, LightHeartGear, TrekkerTent) and others likely to start (e.g. TarpTent). I'm not taking credit for that because some of those were using it before the X-Mid, but the X-Mid has certainly raised the profile of polyester as a tent fabric. The reason polyester is only gaining popularity now is mostly because lightweight versions of it weren't available until the last few years. Historically you could only get heavier polyesters (e.g. 40-70D) which have been used in tents for decades and are quite popular in mountaineering tents, but too heavy for a lightweight tent. Unfortunately the adoption of polyester has been slowed by misinformation about the tear strength of poly which is spread by companies selling nylon tents and consumers reading that info. I say "misinformation" because (1) tear strength isn't actually that important as explained here by the most prolific tent designer of all time, and (2) nylon isn't stronger than poly in real world scenarios. For the weight, nylon does have a small edge in tear strength in lab tests, but this different is commonly wildly overstated. If you look a reputable source like this materials guide from DuPont it lists polyester as being 99% as strong as the best formulation of nylon (Nylon 6.6; see Table II-2). Others will argue nylon has an advantage more like 10%. At the absolute most, the difference is 20%. Now let's say the difference really is 20%, which is being charitable to nylon. That doesn't translate to a real world advantage for two reasons: 1) Nylon loses tear strength rapidly under UV exposure - especially lightweight nylons where the UV can penetrate well into the fabric. A new nylon tent can lose 20% tear strength in a few days of sun, and nylon tents have commonly degraded to under 50% of their original strength after a few years due to UV, whereas polyester is virtually immune to UV degradation (the same dose that degrades a nylon tent by 90% might degrade poly by 1%). 2) Nylon loses about 10% strength when wet. So if you test two brand new tents, yes nylon has a slight edge. But if you take those two brand new tents out in a wet storm, nylon will lose 10% and probably isn't any stronger. And then with continued use the nylon tent will degrade to be much weaker than polyester. That's why I say nylon has no practical tear strength advantage. It's the poly tent that will have longer span and be stronger in continued real world usage. Of course we are talking about lightweight fabrics here. 20D is a light fabric regardless of weather it's nylon or poly. So taking care of it is wise. There's over 5000 X-Mid tents out there now and I've never heard damage to the fly that might have been avoided with a stronger fabric, but it is possible to damage the floor if you're camped on sharp rocks or sticks. So the best practical advise is to be careful with where you pitch it. A second point is that you do want to pitch the tent well so the fly is loose and potentially flapping/rubbing on the ground during a windy night. I did see one fellow get some abrasion damage to the edge of his fly in this scenario. Because of everything I've just explained, there's little rationale to using nylon for tents anymore. Polyester is similar or better in every important metric, and there are new formulations of polyester coming out that aren't commercially available but are much stronger than nylon. So the change will take time but we're seeing a lot of companies switching to poly and I think that will continue such that in another 5-10 years nylon will be rare in tents.
(Edited)
Jun 19, 2020
Jerseyhiker
3
Jun 19, 2020
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Thank you so much for the reply - as you mentioned a lot of us have read articles or seen lab tests showing that nylon is stronger than Poly - and thank you for linking the articles you did! Can't wait to take my x-mid out on the rocky hills of NJ soon - if the shelters would start opening ;P
Jun 19, 2020
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