Ilsa Stove Top 6-Cup Espresso Maker
Ilsa Stove Top 6-Cup Espresso Maker
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Product Description
Make espresso the traditional way with this easy-to-use maker from Ilsa. Far less expensive than an electric espresso maker, this one also takes up less space in the kitchen Read More

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Purerocker2112
0
Aug 18, 2018
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Twenty bucks at IKEA. Maybe a different brand, but exactly the same concept and materials.
Aug 18, 2018
MeFour
2
Mar 15, 2017
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Do yourself a favour and get a bialetti, better product for a better price. Italian grandmothers swear by a bialetti and you cant argue with them they make it everyday
Mar 15, 2017
ZinZan
26
Mar 15, 2017
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Can we get machine coffee grinder on a drop?
Mar 15, 2017
Kalidor
55
Mar 15, 2017
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Thanks for the replies, but I've since learnt not to trust posted content as some similar products on Amazon also states stainless steel, only to have buyers crying foul that it was made of aluminum instead.
Mar 15, 2017
Kalidor
55
Mar 14, 2017
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Can anyone confirm that this is indeed stainless steel and NOT aluminium?
Mar 14, 2017
Rashkh
544
Mar 14, 2017
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It states "Polished stainless-steel construction" in the specs at the bottom of the page.
Mar 14, 2017
Saeulf
96
Mar 14, 2017
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I don't own one, but all the reviews I've read and pictures I've seen say it's stainless steel (18/10).
Mar 14, 2017
Andreugv
70
Mar 14, 2017
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This is a nice moka pot... But guys... This has nothing to do with espresso.
Mar 14, 2017
Saeulf
96
Mar 10, 2017
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Does this include the 3-cup reducer?
Mar 10, 2017
kstokley
961
Buying Manager
Mar 10, 2017
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Yes the reducer is included. I took a quick shot of it broken down. Also includes an extra o-ring.
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Mar 10, 2017
HandOfJake
15
Mar 10, 2017
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Calling a moka-pot an espresso maker is stretching the truth by quite a considerable margin. At the most you could say it can produce an intense coffee somewhat similar to that of espresso. I don't have an espresso machine so the moka-pot is my go-to if I feel like having coffee that's full flavored and intense in a way that I can't get from either my plunger or aeropress. Making a decent moka-pot is quite straight forward, it's kind of hard to mess it up once you know the basics to be honest. -Grind size should be somewhere between a drip filter and and espresso grind, too fine and you'll end up triggering the pressure release valve and or things will taste bitter and over-extracted. -You want to fill the filter section so that it's just below level with ground coffee, If you weigh it out (there's no point really) it's about 26grams. Sometimes I find it's easiest to use a finger to carefully level off the grinds. -Fill the bottom chamber with water just below the safety valve. I use boiling water to speed things up some people say you should use cold water, personally I haven't noticed a difference in flavor. -Place it on the stove at a a medium low heat, too high and the coffee will come out tasting burnt. Ideally you want a slow steady stream once the coffee starts flowing. As the top chamber starts to fill up be ready to take the pot off the heat when it starts to foam and gurgle at the end of the extraction.
Mar 10, 2017
A community member
Mar 13, 2017
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If you fill it with boiling water, doesn't it get too hot to hold while you're attaching the upper section?
Mar 13, 2017
HandOfJake
15
Mar 14, 2017
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Unfortunately yes but you can get away with if you're quick to fill and put the top section on. Usually tho I just grab the nearest dish cloth.
Mar 14, 2017
A community member
Mar 10, 2017
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For a moka pot this is a solid reliable choice, especially if you want steel instead of aluminum. I used one of these for years and it gave me many cups of decent coffee--especially while traveling, since it's small, light, and durable. At home I drink hand drip coffee now, but the Ilsa is still the easiest coffee maker to bring on the road.
Mar 10, 2017
A community member
Mar 22, 2017
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I didn't know the "Neapolitan cafetiere" was a French invention. All I knew was that people either love it or hate it.
Mar 22, 2017
cino
94
Mar 22, 2017
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A parisian to be more precise, Morize was his name. I thought neapolitan users extinct! On another hand I don't know anyone using the milanese while it should be quiet popular among campers and such. Now that's an idea, getting a milanese for pique-niques!
Mar 22, 2017