RH Preyda Sharpening Kit – Drop Exclusive
RH Preyda Sharpening Kit – Drop Exclusive
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Product Description
The folks at RH Preyda know their way around sharpening stones. In fact, they quarry an abundance of 100-percent natural Arkansas stones by hand to ensure it meets their—and your—high standards ... Read More

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14themoney
674
May 22, 2019
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I have DMT Dia-Sharp stones. I can get my knives sharp enuf to shave and to push cut paper, but I am in the market for a guided system. (Something beyond a SSM or a WSKO, which I have.) I don't see how these offer any improvement over what I have. It's not like I have the palsy or feeling dreadfully hung over, but I am not sure that I can maintain a fixed angle for the time required. I have a hard white Arkansas stone, but I really don't use it much. I prefer my other sharpening systems. I have also heard that oil is not a good thing to use, because it will eventually clog up the stone. If anyone has any thots related to this, I would like to hear them. Thanx.
May 22, 2019
Dermott
184
May 22, 2019
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Oil seems to help prevent the stone clogging, while it's in use. If you don't take soap and a brush to the stones, on occasion, they fill with metal particles and oil, and get glassy over time. That slows cutting pretty significantly, but it takes years of sharpening to really be an issue. These stones take a fair bit of abuse. Arkansas stones tend to be a fair bit less expensive than decent diamond stones. Nothing wrong with diamond stones: they do the same job, and probably more quickly. They're just expensive, and they don't last as long. My dad used to wear out diamond stones in a couple years, sharpening chisels. Arkansas stones will last generations (I've got my granddad's old pocket stone). They're not fast, or fancy, but they're cheap, long-lasting, low maintenance, and they do the job. What kind of flat rock (synthetic, water, Arkansas, diamond) you like really is just a matter of preference.
May 22, 2019
Dermott
184
May 22, 2019
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The grits listed are borked, again. It'd be nice if someone that knew something about flat rocks would proof read before posting these. The kit includes three Arkansas stones: a soft stone (400–600 grit), a hard white stone (8,000–10,000 grit), and a hard black stone (2,000–3,000 grit) In order of coarseness, these stones are: soft, hard (here, called hard white), and hard black. Relative grit info on Arkansas stone (regardless of manufacturer) can be found here: https://www.danswhetstone.com/information/stone-grades-101/ The soft stone is probably labeled correctly. Somebody added an extra zero to hard (should be 800-1000). Hard to say, on the hard black stone, since they behave very differently from synthetic or water stones. A good hard black stone is fine enough for careful work as a straight razor hone.
(Edited)
May 22, 2019
H.KM
14
May 22, 2019
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If this is like the last 3 stone kit they sold, then the white stone has an extra 0 for sure. Also, the price is way higher and all you seem to get is a nicer box and holder.
May 22, 2019
Dermott
184
May 22, 2019
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Yeah... definitely the nicer kit. These are the larger (8x2" vs 6x2") stones, and this kit includes both honing oil (3oz will last an eternity) and the rubber stone holder. I've gotten by without a holder... but it makes things a heck of a lot easier for larger things, like kitchen knives.
May 22, 2019
mikegeorge
1
May 22, 2019
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Do there work as a water stone?
May 22, 2019
Dermott
184
May 22, 2019
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If you mean soaking in water and making a slurry... no. If you mean, "Can I use water instead of oil?", you can. Oil on these acts more as a lubricant for the knife on the stone. It does make sharpening easier, but it can be skipped, in a pinch.
May 22, 2019
Ourorboros
0
May 23, 2019
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Yes, some prefer water, or a mix of water + dish soap, or water + oil + dish soap. No soaking needed. No slurry. Just a splash and go.
May 23, 2019
MickEspo77
5
May 22, 2019
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$45 and free shipping from Amazon
May 22, 2019
enero
384
May 22, 2019
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where? I don't see this particular set offered on amazon. Closest is their three way system for $75. Which is still a way better deal than this, but not the exact model.
May 22, 2019
Eddieflyguy
1
Mar 25, 2019
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This sharpening kit is suitable for all metal blade knives, not for ceramic knives. That said, these are seriously high quality Arkansas stones, used properly, will provide years of use. Your EDC and Kitchen knives will be happy! I use mine weekly on over a dozen different size and types of knives.
Mar 25, 2019
sirtruman
0
Mar 19, 2019
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is this good for sharpening your edc knife ?
Mar 19, 2019
MickEspo77
5
May 22, 2019
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Amazon has the same setup for $45
May 22, 2019
jzen0
164
Mar 12, 2019
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Would this work well for the Massdrop x Apogee/Massdrop x Apogee Takumi knives? vs Sharpmaker?
Mar 12, 2019
Dermott
184
Mar 12, 2019
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Yes, if you want to use natural Arkansas stones for sharpening your kitchen knives. I keep a block of Wusthof's razor sharp with similar stones. If you're after a more modernized system than "flat rock", or aren't confident you can use the flat rock properly, these may not be for you. Keep in mind Arkansas stones are very different from Japanese-style water stones. These aren't soft, don't work into a slurry, and don't require soaking or re-truing frequently.
Mar 12, 2019
jzen0
164
Mar 12, 2019
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Thanks!
Mar 12, 2019
Jack87
5
Mar 12, 2019
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can you hone a straight edge razor with this kit?
Mar 12, 2019
Chris_in_Alberta
1
Mar 12, 2019
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Thanks for sharing. I just started learning how to hone, and I've seen lots on Arks, Jnats and Cotis and am still relatively confused as to which I should really try first. The best advice I've seen is that they all work, but you have to figure out what works for you.
Mar 12, 2019
Dermott
184
Mar 12, 2019
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Right. Using an Arkansas stone is very different from a natural Japanese water stone. Or a synthetic water stone, or a synthetic oil stone... They've all got a different character. If you already know how to sharpen knives, and have a method that works, build from there. My granddad grew up using Arkansas stones for everything. He gave me a flat rock when I had a pocket knife, showed me how to use it, and I'm still using a flat rock. =) Nice thing about Arkansas stones is that they don't really wear into a bowl, over time, like the softer stones. Downside is that they cut sloooooooooooow. That means you need a really steady hand, and lots of practice, or you just round the edge off. Not much of a problem with a razor, though, since you can just tape the spine and lay the whole thing against the stone.
Mar 12, 2019
dgt5
105
Mar 12, 2019
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New to sharpening. Is this a good set to start with or maybe something like the Spyderco sharpmaker? My knives are VG10, S30V and 154CM.
Mar 12, 2019
anteck7
53
Mar 13, 2019
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Go with the sharpmaker if you are into pocket knives, or go with a diamond stone. Will these stones work, sure, so would a brick, but just like knife steels have progressed so has sharpening tech.
Mar 13, 2019
Eddieflyguy
1
Mar 25, 2019
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These stones will work great as long as you know the proper technique.
Mar 25, 2019
Spokes30
80
Mar 12, 2019
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It is a typo, they mean 10000.
Mar 12, 2019
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