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AKra
18
Jul 2, 2015
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How long is the burn in time on these? I've heard 400 hours from some, and no burn-in time from others... I'm confused.
Jul 2, 2015
wowsers
37
Jul 2, 2015
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AKG themselves thinks these cans (their cans in general) need to burn in about 300 hours, hifi sites that take sound seriously usually burn speakers in even more (even up to 400-500 or more hours in some cases). I can't honestly say how these behave when it comes to burn in (I don't own them yet), but I think 100 hours will probably be enough for the average joe (take occasional listens if you want to hear how big the difference becomes!). Just put them in whatever fashion you like to burn them in (average joe would just put on some music album on repeat in a average/slightly above average volume). You can always listen too them straight out of the box, but the highs will probably be a little to sharp for comfortable listening before at least some burn in.
Jul 2, 2015
AKra
18
Jul 3, 2015
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Just got these and I'm currently burning them in with a 10-hour white noise video. Should I stick to just white noise, or switch to some regular music or other colors of noise after 10 hours? Also I'm using these for mixing and mastering EDM, so I'd like them to sound as good and accurate as possible.
Jul 3, 2015
wowsers
37
Jul 3, 2015
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I'm not a well educated man when it comes to burn in, but I do think you should play something bassy as well to "warm up" the part of the diaphragm that deals with that too, watching AKG's video on their 'varimotion' diaphragm suggests these cans utilize different areas of the support ring that flexes (really just normal physics happening), so my idea would be to play as large a range of music/sound as possible to get the diaphragm 'used' to all the frequencies (ie. burn in). you could also try mixtures of bass mid and high tones/noise just mixed together reasonably in audacity. But again, how you burn in is your choice, I just have a few ideas I like to share.
And if you are going to mix and master EDM music, also use a pair of normal cans (or earbuds) so you can see what most people will hear, a neutral set of cans are great for detail but when you bring out the speakers most people use most of the sound will get drowned or weird (it's mostly bass and highs you will hear), just a heads up.
Jul 3, 2015
mwweichi
19
Jul 4, 2015
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Can't be sure, but seems like these headphones had a bit of a scratchy sound at the beginning and now sound quite smooth and crispy clean after just a few hours of low volume listening for burn-in. They sound quite neutral aside from a bit of bass hump. I wouldn't bother with extensive burn-in or use burn-in specific files because they are already easy to listen to.
Jul 4, 2015
AKra
18
Jul 4, 2015
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Yeah I'll A/B w/ these and my M100's
Jul 4, 2015
AKra
18
Jul 4, 2015
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I felt that the stereo field had not developed when I tried them out of the box, but burning them in with white noise has helped them open up.
Jul 4, 2015
Fuzz
388
Jul 6, 2015
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There are many people who feel that burning in headphones doesn't make a difference, I did notice a difference after I did it, but it was probably psychological. :P
The problem with using crappy headphones or earbuds to listen to the music you produce is that it shouldn't make a difference to your process, it's not like you're going to want to tweak your music to make it sound better on inferior equipment..regardless of genre..
Jul 6, 2015
wowsers
37
Jul 6, 2015
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What I mean is that you should always listen to several cans on different sides of the spectrum so you'll not get too blinded by the signature sound of a specific set of cans, if I had a pair of really warm cans I would likely miss out on some detail, if I didn't hear that detail a person with colder cans might have that sound being over announced and think the mixing was wonky. I think in those lines, but I agree that good music shouldn't be made for shitty speakers, otherwise people might mix classical for a set of beats or something else silly.
Jul 6, 2015
Fuzz
388
Jul 6, 2015
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I don't really do much production (any more,) but I juggle a few sets of relatively inexpensive output devices around, I have a pair of old Grado SR80s, Shure E3Cs, a set of Mackie reference monitors and AEGo Ms but I've not seen any glaring defects with most sources, I feel that as long as your devices are above a certain (decent) quality, it should almost never be an issue though.
I do tend to prefer more neutral/flat audio profiles though.
Jul 6, 2015
wowsers
37
Jul 6, 2015
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Those are still better than you regular $2 earbuds :P I prefer a bit neutralish audio, allround speaker to be honest. If I can listen to movies, classical music and really hard beat dance music (give and take a bit on all ends) I'm perfectly happy
Jul 6, 2015
Joomy
212
Jul 7, 2015
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Audio enjoyment is a purely subjective thing. Burning in likely does nothing to affect the actual sound of the headphones and is really just you getting more used to the sound of your new cans. Regardless, if you believe that burning in helps the sound then it likely will, simply because you expect it to. Read: http://www.innerfidelity.com/content/evidence-headphone-break
Jul 7, 2015
wowsers
37
Jul 7, 2015
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I think I have to disagree with you there, from all years I've dealt with audio and recorded speakers I am sure burn in exists. Recording and analyzing audio in both home and school shows definitive sound signature changes that happen from first use, through burn in and finally when the sound have settled and the burn in is complete, the only thing I can really call spoof is the amount of time it usually takes, the variation between individual drivers is usually bigger than the difference 100 and 200 hours does on most speakers, but not on all mind you. If I would just get used to the sound of a particular pair of speakers over time I would probably think a pair of the same speakers I've used for several years sounded bad right? But they don't, if burn in didn't exist we would just begin to dislike every other particular driver that didn't sound the same as our "newer" pair of listening speakers. Just try to compare two subwoofers of the same model, the one that has been burned in will usually have more punch and get down lower in frequency than the non burned in one. A/B'ing and analyzing audio proves there is a difference, even if the mentality plays a big role in the whole thing.
Jul 7, 2015
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