Ingersoll New Haven Automatic Watch
Ingersoll New Haven Automatic Watch
bookmark_border
Where's the price?
To negotiate the best possible price for our customers, we agree to hide prices prior to logging in.
516 Sold
Product Description
Founded in New York in 1892, Ingersoll specializes in watches with American heritage. Over the last century plus, the company’s made a lot of timepieces, but perhaps the most indelible is its Mickey Mouse series, which sold more than 5 million pieces throughout the 1930s and '40s Read More
Classic American Watches Since 1892

Founded in New York in 1892, Ingersoll specializes in watches with American heritage. Over the last century plus, the company’s made a lot of timepieces, but perhaps the most indelible is its Mickey Mouse series, which sold more than 5 million pieces throughout the 1930s and '40s. The Ingersoll New Haven automatic may not have a cartoon mouse on it, but it has a classic look that jives in virtually any setting. Pairing slim indices and hands with a clean, rounded case, the watch is comfy and elegant. Aside from a day-date window, it’s very spare, owing to its versatility. Powered by a Miyota 820A automatic movement, the New Haven is water resistant to 50 meters and available in a variety of styles.

Note: At checkout, you'll have your choice from a variety of models.

Style
Specs
  • Ingersoll
  • Case material: Stainless steel
  • Band material: Leather
  • Japanese Miyota 820A automatic movement
  • Scratch-resistant mineral glass
  • Deployment buckle (T00505 has a sliding clasp)
  • Caseback: Exhibition
  • Case thickness: 14 mm
  • Case width: 40 mm
  • Water resistance: 50 m (164 ft)
Included
  • Presentation box
  • Instruction manual
  • Lifetime warranty
Shipping

All orders will be shipped by Drop.

Estimated ship date is Dec 11, 2020 PT.

Payment will be collected at checkout. After this product run ends, orders will be submitted to the vendor up front, making all orders final. Check the discussion for updates on your order.

Customer Reviews0
All of our reviews are from verified customers.
Showing 0 of 43 reviews
Recent Activity
What are you talking about with this reply. You go off on tangents and put words in people's mouths that make no sense. You open with a personal slight about someone's age, when none was made toward you. No one made any claims to or even mentioned "authenticity". Hearkening back to something does not imply authenticity in this world or any other, it simply means that it reminds someone of something older. There are also cheaper automatic movements that hack. I'm curious where price plays into this? This isn't even Miyota's most stripped down movement. One could by all means make the movement hack without issue. A good reliable movement doesn't HAVE to be expensive. Lots of quartz movements are cheap and reliable, that was the point of them. To purchase this particular movement to replace it, is around 40 USD, which isn't a lot, but it is nearly half the price of the watch. I also never made claims to any kind of justification to put anything anywhere. I cannot make any justification for why someone made the choice to go with this Miyota movements. I can just say, with certainty, that Miyota(Citizen) movements are generally reliable and good. Given Ingresoll, the history and style of watch it makes sense to put a less expensive 70's movement in it. The watch is vintage styled, it's the same simple case style that the old Ingersoll used in their 60s and 70s watches. That's what makes it vintage styled (not in and of itself vintage). No claim was made that the watch was itself vintage. There are lots of new watches that use a vintage style, this doesn't make them vintage, no one claimed it was. "Theres is NO connection between the Ingersoll you refer to (the dollar watch maker) and the Ingersoll represented above" Yes there is, when you buy a company you also tend to buy their designs and trademarks. That's not implying that Ingersoll had amazing designs to begin with, which was the entire point of bringing it up. It was company that was never founded with the highest of expectations, it was a company that was founded with the ideal to put a watch in everyone's pocket. This watch is extremely accessible, which I would argue is the entire point of an Ingersoll. If you don't agree with that connection that's fine, but it certainly is reminder for me where Ingersoll came from. Making the assertion that it's great for people who don't understand watches also doesn't make sense given Ingersoll's history. You also say "the watch is modern enough" but then say you got rid of it because it doesn't hack and wind, which are more modern automatic movement features. It's "modern enough" but not modern enough for you to hang on to, which again, is fine, all of this is preference anyway, I'm certainly not going to pass judgement on anyone's preferences, and that's not my point. It just adds to the confusing and meandering post that is book-ended by personal attacks and doesn't really talk at all about watches or their history.
First of all, why would you begin you comment with: "I mean..." as if you were trying to clarify a comment or point you'd made earlier, when in fact, you had not? As far as I can see, this (the comment I'm replying to now) is actually the first comment you've contributed to this (several month old) conversation? I'm going to chalk that bit up to YOUTH (so as not to cast aspersions on your high school English Composition teacher, who probably tried his or her best, but even now winces every time he or she hears someone of your generation begin a sentence with the conjunction/connective word: "So." On that score, I'm with him (or her). Meanwhile, as to you point, (in a nutshell) that Miyota makes bare minimum functioning movements for those unwilling to pay more for better ones, and that somehow justifies Ingersoll's use of them, and to your mind even makes them more authentic? I say, don't make me laugh! Theres is NO connection between the Ingersoll you refer to (the dollar watch maker) and the Ingersoll represented above, NONE, and no one is suggesting there is at this point, not even the Chinese company that bought the right to use those nine letters (only in that particular sequence), not even the people who write the copy for this site and Ingersoll's who claim otherwise! Second, if they have changed the movement due to feedback (I haven't verified that independently) I hope to god I was in some small way, responsible because I have broached the subject on numerous occasions! Thirdly, what the hell do you mean calling this a bloody "vintage style watch"?!!! When the hell did round dials absent of Arabic numerals suddenly become VINTAGE?!!! Dare I ask, when you say "vintage" do you mean it in the Brittany Spears sense of the word, or are we just talking Justin Bieber-vintage? Don't answer that--I don't want to know! Bottom line: the watch is modern enough, not terribly priced, not half-bad looking, and with a better movement (one that does hack and wind) would be a square-deal for anyone whom it may appeal to--PERIOD. If, as I stated earlier, those points (hacking and winding, specifically) don't mean anything to a perspective buyer, he or she is getting the deal of a life-time with this watch. Now "get out'a here kid, you bother me!" [image]