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TEAC TN-300SE & TN-350 Turntables

TEAC TN-300SE & TN-350 Turntables

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Product Description
Modern functionality meets old-school cool in the TEAC TN-300SE: a belt-driven, two-speed turntable with an straight tonearm, an all-new motor assembly, and a built-in USB output that makes it easy to archive your vinyl collection. The Neoprene-coated, high-inertia aluminum diecast platter is driven by a high-torque DC motor and a polished stainless steel spindle, which work together to deliver precise speed consistency and tonal accuracy Read More

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MrMengo
0
Aug 15, 2019
Any chance the ones that are out of stock (black tn-300 and tn-350) will be back up any time soon?
RayF
22319
Aug 14, 2019
So...no cake attachment with this one?
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Maybe in the Baking Community then?
Mmmmmmm. Cake.
RayF
22319
Aug 15, 2019
Right up there with Vegemite!
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amb3cog
90
Aug 14, 2019
cough*slickdeals*cough
Too bad these aren't the TN-550 and TN-570. I'd seriously have to make a save versus willpower if it was.
Unless you are a millenial who is just getting into record players for the laughs of using your parents obsolete entertainment technology (like my generation did with 8 tracks!) I don't think this is a good idea. If you have records you value and love, you should do them justice with a decent turntable. Not only for fidelity, but also because crappy turntables eat records. It's a contact medium like analog tape where every time you play you wear down the medium a little. The better the turntable and needle, the less wear.
mightypuma
2
Aug 16, 2019
Don't get me wrong, I couldn't agree more that crappy record players eat records and a crap turntable is in general a false economy, but I'm not sure why you think these turntabes falls into that category! These turntables are generally well thought of with a half decent stylus (Audio Technica’s AT95E) from a giant of Japanese audio and the price is very, very good. I think I would be encouraging neo-vinylites to buy this sort of thing over the deluge of Crosley players. If my nephew was interested in getting himself a first turntable I would definitely tell him this was a decent choice at a price that is just crazy.
they are better than those Uraban Outfitter hipster turntables. But I've also seen more than one review knocking the build quality on these. There is one in the comments here talking about misaligned head shell. Which is a fatal flaw. I have a theory about manufacturing. That if the item being manufactured isn't in use in the country of origin, you are going to get an inferior product. So for example, if the skill and tooling is the same, I'd expect a guitar from Mexico to be superior to a guitar from China. Given that guitars are pretty well known in Mexico and uncommon in China. Point being, do they still make records anywhere except for nostalgic Americans? I'm not sure anyone in China has a clue about what a record player does anymore. And at this price I'm certain that is the country of origin. I follow a few Japanese bands, and know they put out vinyl for JDM. And hifi is and always has been big over there. So a Teac from Japan would possibly be great.
(Edited)
Edgeman
2
Aug 14, 2019
Besides the S curve tonearm, I'm not sure what the differences are between the two options.
Edgeman
2
Aug 14, 2019
They both have: Phono Equalizer Amplifier
  • Type of amplifier: MM type (On/Thru switchable)

jrw1
26
Aug 14, 2019
My mistake then, the description written by Drop would imply the 350 adds the preamp because it is not indicated in their description of the 300. I see now where they do list it at the bottom under specs for both. Looks like Teac considers the tonearm an upgrade. Can't see any other difference either.
slobberchops
6
Aug 14, 2019
Description says "straight tonearm" but the image shows S-shaped.
emthered
3
Aug 14, 2019
The TN-300SE has a straight arm. You can get the S-shaped tone arm TN-350 (without the "SE") for $15 more.
(Edited)
slobberchops
6
Aug 14, 2019
I should have read further... thanks.
Galilchan
37
Aug 26, 2018
Does this guy have an automatic return function or does it have to be set and returned manually.
A community member
Aug 26, 2018
This is a manual turntable, so you have to retrieve the tone arm, it does not happen automatically.
A community member
Aug 24, 2018
I have the TN-300 (not the SE version). The two look cosmetically identical, so I'm not sure what the differences are. Probably in the preamp, I'm guessing.
There were a ton of problems with my turntable.
The platter wasn't machined smoothly where it sits on the spindle, so I had to file off an imperfection to get it to rotate without stuttering. The spindle was not mounted level in the plinth. Therefore, even a perfect platter would sit tilted slightly but visibly noticeable in relation to the plinth.
The azimuth of the tonearm was off. This was a manufacturing defect in the tonearm where the headshell receptable mounts to the arm. The screw hole that affixes the headshell socket (not the headshell itself) was drilled slightly off-center, which causes the headshell/cartridge to sit tilted sideways in relation to the record.
The wow and flutter was noticeably audible on sustained notes, especially acoustic instruments in the midrange, such as piano or strings. This wasn't a manufacturing defect, but was in-line with the specs.
No matter what I did with the turntable, I couldn't tame a nasty sibilance problem, even when using an AT-440MLb with MicroLine stylus, and properly aligning the cart with the proper equipment, and setting tracking force using a digital scale. This was true for any tracking force within the cart manufacturer's specifications. I even tried adjusting the VTA by using various aftermarket mats of varying thicknesses and a USB microscope, but couldn't get it to stop hissing on esses like a scorned woman.
Also, the pivot is in the headshell, not the arm. This means, despite having a swappable headshell, you are limited to using TEAC's proprietary shell with the pivot. You can physically install a standard headshell, but you'll have alignment issues.
I will say that the built-in phono preamp was surprisingly good. I liked it way better than the Schiit Mani, U-Turn Pluto, and a little bit better than the MM phono pre in my vintage SAE P102 Preamplifier.
I ended up replacing the tonearm with the S-shaped one from the TN-400S, removing the spindle, milling the hole in the plinth flat and reinstalling the spindle.
Now, after these mods/repairs, I have a TT whose sound I like quite a bit for the price with the internal phono preamp (except for the audible wow/flutter).
Would I go back and do it all over again? No... Except, that beautiful gloss cherry finish with aluminum highlights does make a tempting piece of mid-fi furniture once you get the kinks worked out.
JamesMelton
16
Aug 14, 2019
So once you put 30 hours of work into it assuming you can diagnose turntable design faults and have very good hand machining skills and all the tools you need and are willing to replace the tone arm entirely, which is a rather significant piece of a turntable IMO, you get a sort of pretty looking "meh" turntable. I think I'll stick to my very inexpensive 1980s Technics that worked immediately without any effort and accepted a Grado blue with all of 5 minutes installation time and which surely sounds at least as good as "meh".
JESUSARIUS_REX
51
Aug 14, 2019
Thanks, I was interested, now I won't waste my money. Think I'll just buy a vintage unit for cheap and be happy.
(Edited)
GunsOfBrixton
905
Aug 24, 2018
Is it just me, or is that review the lamest endorsement ever?
It reminds of the Steve Martin line from his "Dear Amanda" bit:
"Remember how your mother raved about me, calling me 'pleasant' ? "
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