Showing 1 of 46 conversations about:
kiwijunglist
79
Apr 2, 2015
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Small subs shouldn't be ported. You'll get port noise around the tuning freq at any reasonable volume, the tuning freq will be high because of the short port length meaning that bass response will fall off below the tuning frequency. You can't boost the EQ on a ported sub below the tuning frequency because you will hit xmax (ie the cone travels further than it's limit). A sealed sub won't be as loud at the tuning frequency, but will have less group delay, better low extension, less port noise, better bass extension below the port tuning frequency.
You shouldn't be using sub woofers to mix unless you have a sound treated studio room with bass traps to avoid room nodes/nulls etc. You will get a way better more accurate result with headphones. To test this go here http://onlinetonegenerator.com/subwoofer.html you will notice that the volume varies up and down as the frequency varies. This is especially noticable from 50 to 20hz. Eventually the volume will drop when you start playing below the lowest frequency your speakers can handle.
Apr 2, 2015
DALE
36
Apr 3, 2015
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Do you have this sub? Maybe this sub is different?
Apr 3, 2015
kiwijunglist
79
Apr 5, 2015
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No I don't own this sub. I own 2 ported commercial subs, and I'm in the process of building 4x custom sealed subs. You can't cheat physics, the same laws apply for all subs and for all acoustic environments. Recommending a ported subwoofer for studio mixing in a home studio that doesn't have acoustic treatment is just wrong on so many levels. Get a good headphone.
Apr 5, 2015
DALE
36
Apr 6, 2015
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I'm not really into mixing yet. I just wanted it to pair it with the HS8 monitors & the Grace M920.
Apr 6, 2015
kiwijunglist
79
Apr 6, 2015
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Can you stretch to $499 Delivered. Look at svs sb1000 subwoofer. http://www.svsound.com/subwoofers/sealed-box/sb-1000 svs do a refund less shipping if returned within 45 days.
Apr 6, 2015
Anonymouse
216
May 23, 2015
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Was going to recommend the exact same thing. At $499 an SB1000 is worth more than two of these. The SB2000 is even better, if you can stretch to it; unlike the Yamaha, that genuinely will give useful output at 22Hz.
Also, Yamaha specs: "Frequency range (-10dB) 22Hz - 160Hz"
Quoting a frequency range at MINUS TEN DECIBELS is a really disingenuous way to sell a subwoofer. Response range is generally measured to the point where the sub dips 3dB below reference (and sometimes -6, but that's pretty oily too), and given output halves for every 3dB down, minus 10dB is just taking the piss. That's about 6-7 times less sound output than -3, so even if you acoustically treated your room and got placement spot on, if you're mastering with sub-bass content you'd still end up mixing the deep octaves far too loud. It'd sound terrible on a truly flat full-range system, and make less-capable systems shit themselves mutely thrashing their woofers about unless they have some sort of protective high pass filter built in (which a lot of stuff doesn't). If they quoted the -3dB frequency range I bet this thing doesn't dip that much below 40Hz. An eight inch driver just doesn't have that sort of puff. Look at a sealed 10-12" for your application or you'll only hear the easy half of the sub-bass spectrum. SVS are super cheap for very impressive performance and you can just send it back if you don't like it (if you're in the US).
(And, they sell refurbs and cosmetically damaged stock too if you want to save even more...)
May 23, 2015
Elemino
7
May 24, 2015
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The sub you're recommending doesn't look like a studio monitor. It doesn't even have balanced inputs.
May 24, 2015
Anonymouse
216
May 24, 2015
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If you're not running very long cables, that's a total non- issue, and even if you are, remember also that you're dealing with very low frequency signals going to the sub and any cable noise is effectively going to be removed by the sub's high pass filter. If it really bothers you, the SB13-Ultra has balanced inputs (and parametric EQ), but is $1600, so getting out of the budget territory now. It's an absolute brute, though, putting 1000W into its ultra-long-throw 13" driver and yet fitting it all within an 18" cube of volume not much bigger than the Yamaha. Chalk and cheese to a short-throw 8" at 150W. The HS8 "sub" is more of a remote woofer, really.
Also, a ported sub doesn't look like a studio monitor either, unless it's large enough that its tuning frequency is right down at the limit of hearing (which requires a big box indeed), because it's going to give very non-linear response otherwise. Not to mention port noise ("chuffing") which can become an issue at high output, and is non-existent on sealed subs. The larger driver area, longer throw, sealed, and far more powerful SVS units (SB1000 or SB2000, or even SB13-Ultra) are much better suited to the application of mastering than this tiny, underpowered, ported unit.
May 24, 2015
Elemino
7
May 25, 2015
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I believe this series of monitors are for music anyway. It's rather rare you will run into frequencies that low in music. Movies are a different story, and you would most likely need something with lower frequency response, but for music, I see no reason this isn't a suitable companion for the HS8s. Price wise, the Yamaha equipment has never been a bargain or value brand, but you get pretty good equipment for the cost.
May 25, 2015
Anonymouse
216
May 26, 2015
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Electronic music is very popular and has genuine full-range content. It also lends itself well to small home studio setups since most of the "instruments" are digitally generated, from scratch or from samples, so you don't need an elaborate acoustic recording setup, just mixing and monitoring. You can't effectively monitor it in-room without a calibrated, full-range sub setup, though. You can hear the sub-bass on good phones but you can't feel the body cavity resonances and tactile skin stuff, which is part of the experience you're trying to create.
And none of what you said changes the fact that the frequency range specs are quoted in a very disingenuous way, so how can you trust any of the other manufacturer's specs or claims on the product when they're trying to be deceptive and misleading in even just one area? You have to assume there's similar behaviour in other areas you're not even noticing, especially if you're not sure what all the specs mean anyway.
May 26, 2015
Elemino
7
May 31, 2015
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Yamaha and I have a history. Others may not be able to trust them. I've owned and used some of their other subs, and they're decent. I'd rather find a studio monitor sub than buy one for home theater though. They aren't going to be neutral in most cases.
May 31, 2015
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