Massdrop x Apogee Vital Super Slicer Kitchen Knife
Massdrop x Apogee Vital Super Slicer Kitchen Knife
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Product Description
Our third collaboration with Apogee Culinary, and the second knife in the Vital series, the Super Slicer is designed to slice bread and pastries without excess crumbs, and to slice meats without releasing their juices—in other words, everything you can’t do effectively with the original Vital 8-inch chef’s knife. When paired with the original, this formidable duo can tackle 90 percent of kitchen cuts Read More

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SDante
101
May 15, 2020
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These are the kind of knives you normally buy for $20 a pair, not $60 and never $90.
May 15, 2020
14themoney
1290
Feb 18, 2020
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Knivesandtools.com The best method is to use a ceramic sharpening rod. This allows you to sharpen tooth for tooth. It is important to choose a sharpening rod whose diameter matches the serrations of your knife. When your sharpening rod is too thick, you will not fit quite right into the serrations and then sharpening is pointless. The sharpening rod by Lansky has a diameter of 8mm and is therefore thin enough for sharpening most bread knives. Then again it is so thin, that it takes a bit more work to hit the entire serration of a more coarse serration. The sharpening rod by Edge Pro is a bit thicker, measuring 13mm, but fits well for many breadknives. The Skerper sharpening rod measures 14mm and is a good option for coarser types of serrations.
Feb 18, 2020
blackcat1
6
Feb 1, 2020
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OK. For people that have no idea about this knife:
  • It’s a beveled edged knife first designed for pastry chefs.
  • if you hone it with a steel or sharpen on a stone, only do so on the angled side and NOT the straight side or this will effectively ruin your knife.
  • If & when you decide that your knife needs to be sharpened further, use a steel meant for a chain saw, (this is available at a good hardware store) & finish off with a good flat edged steel or knife block.
  • The knife is rounded at the front because it was first designed to cut both pastries & more importantly, cakes. Trust me when I say, this designed knife is perfect for bread. I have been using this particularly designed knife for over 25 years as a chef. Of course manufactured by different companies.
  • The only thing I can see that could be a failure, is that the blade is exactly the same height from tip to hilt. Normally with this design, there is approx 0.3 inches difference in height from tip to hilt. This does make a difference, even if it sounds so small.
  • Price wise, it has a cheap price tag, so who knows what the quality will be like.
  • That’s it, that’s all I have, hope it was helpful.
Feb 1, 2020
AlessandroBerti
0
Dec 13, 2019
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Really beautiful! beautiful lines, I also found this Italian site very interesting Coltelli da Chef
Dec 13, 2019
jonro
34
Oct 4, 2019
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I don't like the handle on it at all. There's no place to support your finger on the top and the handle looks a bit short, from the photos. I'm not a chef, but personally I feel that a slicer should have Granton scallops and a bread knife should be serrated. I think that it would not make a good meat slicer with the serrated blade.
Oct 4, 2019
mwpeterson
31
Jul 14, 2019
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Has anyone used Apogee’s sharpening service? Is it worth the hassle of shipping the knife off? The slicer didn’t come from the factory very sharp (compared to the chef’s knife). Is there any reason to expect a sharper edge the second time? Or am I better off taking my Lansky stones to it and keeping it up myself? Pretty sure I just answered my question, but appreciate any insights or experiences y’all have. Thanks!
Jul 14, 2019
reswright
2819
Jun 16, 2019
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Go figure that out of all the Apogee knifes they’re selling as having a bolster, the one they actually put it on was the bread knife. SMDH
Jun 16, 2019
RayF
22105
Jun 15, 2019
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I actually purchased a sort-of expensive slicing-knife (about half the price of these), over the past holidays. The sole purpose of which was to carve up several bone-in Prime Rib roasts I had become hooked on cooking. So allow me relate a couple of things I learned about both, along the way! First off, Prime Rib isn't that expensive to buy and it's amazingly easy to prepare; each of mine got rave reviews. When the occasion arrises, I recommend "Chef John's" Youtube recipe. Second, carving a big piece of meat with a chef's knife is hard to do--you'll get through it, but trying to get uniform, attractive looking slices is tuff. Even a good carving knife, the sort you'd use on a turkey, is less than ideal (they "wander"). Realizing the limitations of both (first hand), I ordered a 12" slicing knife from a restaurant supply house. What a difference! For meat, the trick is very fine creations, not the big teeth you see on a bread knife (you don't want to tear the meat). Because the blade's dimensions are uniform through out the entire length of draw, you get slices that are the same width from top to bottom, and it's easy to control the thickness of each slice--makes things look quite civilized rather than the caveman results I achieved first time around. So, a very worthwhile tool to have in your knife drawer for sure. Not sure you need to pay ninety-bucks for one, but they are quite handy when needed.
(Edited)
Jun 15, 2019
SDante
101
May 24, 2019
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But can it cut through a leather shoe?
May 24, 2019
RayF
22105
Jun 15, 2019
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Send me one of your's and I'll let you know.
Jun 15, 2019
Naftoor
288
May 23, 2019
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90 for a bread knife? It's almost like they aren't the cheapest knife to buy other then paring knives and you can't get an amazing one for 10-20 bucks. The only reason to buy this is to have a handle that matches the vital. The steel is irrelevant as the heat treat is likely garbage as the prior knife was, and you likely will never be able to sharpen it unless willing to send it to Apogee (who by all standards have good customer service and free lifetime sharpening). A tojiro or mercer can be had for 15 bucks and to your door in two days. I can't speak for the tojiro although I've heard good things, but the mercer is a laser that flies through bread. I've had it for a few years, and I expect to have it for another 10 since I only use it for the occasional home baked loaf. It's scalloped and also has a slightly offset handle so you don't smack your knuckles into whatever board you cut on, which was sacrificed in this knife for the clean lines. The thing is a menace and has to be handled with caution because it is only too happy to eat your hand and whatever loaf you put in front of it. The force may have the light and dark, but a lightsaber knows no good or evil, only how to cut. Enough folks have posted pictures of cracked or snapped vitals so that I don't trust the heat treat for the knife. This knife is presumably heated treated by the same incompetent folks. I wouldn't trust it on a crusty loaf, brittle steel + hard crust + pressure to cut through the crust = recipe for snapping. This knife will probably last you a life time, if it doesn't crack like the vitals have been doing or chip itself to death. Personally I'd rather save 60 for a tool that will do the job better and not have a matching set, but I care about my wallet and how well a job gets done over how it looks doing it. Also a serrated knife for meat? What is this? A buffet? A roast should be sliced with a smooth edged knife, nobody wants prechewed meat on their plate. Granted scallops tear less then traditional serrations, but still.
May 23, 2019
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