QSP Harpyie S35VN Liner Lock Knife
QSP Harpyie S35VN Liner Lock Knife
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Product Description
New from QSP, the Harpyie delivers on looks and performance. A full-sized knife measuring 8.6 inches, this folder carries itself like one half its size Read More

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Kavik
4583
Nov 5, 2019
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Have to say, this is a damn nice looking handle.... Just wish the blade didn't look so anorexic. It has that "sharpened weekly for 20 years" look to it Tempting though, haven't tried anything from them yet
Nov 5, 2019
ponagathos
465
Nov 10, 2019
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Thanks for posting that link. I hate these greyscale images Drop is using since they did the re-design. I would prefer to have a more accurate pic of the product then an artistic looking website.
Nov 10, 2019
Fixall
220
Feb 23, 2020
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Agreed. The handle is gorgeous (reminds me of a Civivi Rustic Gent), but the blade shape and grind really just doesn't do it for me.
Feb 23, 2020
woptucci
48
Nov 5, 2019
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I have owned 2 QSP knives, 1 I was ambivalent about and the other the QSP Pelican in what they call flax I liked very much until the lock failed a few minutes after I unboxed it and I failed to notice how early the lock up was (10%) and it nicked me, I then opened the second knife to find the same early lock up so I returned them both. If someone can tell me the benefit of an early lock up I am all ears. Isn't the reason we use frame and liner lock for safety reasons? I talked with someone more familiar with this up and coming brand and he mentioned this was an ongoing problem with their knives, OK so fix the problem and I will gladly buy this knife. From what I can tell in the one photo it looks to be another early lock up bound to fail...
(Edited)
Nov 5, 2019
reswright
1780
Nov 6, 2019
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as far as the TwoSun:
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yeah. I mean, I love TwoSun but the person who designed this just wants to watch the world burn. It's Night Morning Design work, which as of late is quite good - but this thing just looks like a trip to the ER waiting to happen. I'm sure it's possible to use this thing as a razor. It might even be possible to shave with it, though that's a bit of a smile. I'm much less sanguine that someone could use this thing as a comb without drawing blood inside of fifteen seconds, their own or indeed that of anyone standing particularly close by.
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Nov 6, 2019
Kavik
4583
Nov 6, 2019
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haha i didn't see the disclaimer on the site I pulled it up on Agreed, the handle doesn't look like it'd be a problem for shaving, but the blade is definitely a problem for combing lol I actually like the blade profile for a razor. Slight smile, proud toe...not recommended for beginners who value their earlobes, but fine for experienced users I find smiling razors a joy to use, just a pain in the ass to sharpen, I've never quite gotten the hang of it. It's the frowning ones you gotta watch out for 😫
Nov 6, 2019
Spokes30
187
Nov 5, 2019
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This is a true liner lock knife anyway you look at it. The moveable part of the lock is cut from the liner of the knife and I am sure it is stainless steel. A knife with manmade materials on the scales has to be a liner lock because those materials cannot act as a lock. I know of one carbon fibre knife where the lock is actually made from the carbon fibre of the scales. This is very rare and definitely doesn't happen with a knife with a bolster and one that costs only $99. Bottom line this looks like a pretty nice knife though a bit large with the S35V steel and some carbon fibre accents at this price point. This QSP seems to be becoming another Bestech, maybe even better.
Nov 5, 2019
Kavik
4583
Nov 5, 2019
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Friendly tip: it's easier to follow a conversation, and to get the attention to the person you're writing to, if you click Reply on their comment, instead of posting a whole separate comment that's not attached to the original thread.
Nov 5, 2019
Kados
248
Nov 5, 2019
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Note for those who care. This is technically a frame lock. It has dual scales but the part that moves in behind the blade is part of the structural frame, not a seperate piece of punched metal. Not quite sure why MD keeps labeling frame locks as liner locks just because the lockup is covered with a scale, rather than being exposed. The Brad Zinker Dogtooth, Ferrum Forge Gent, All the Eric Ochs knives, and several others (basically every dual scale MD colab) are also frame locks, despite being listed as liners. Another easy way to tell if a knife is a liner or frame (some knifes like the Eric Ochs do not provide images of the lock up) is to look at what the lock is made of. If it lists the lock as being made from Ti, then it is 100% a frame lock. True liner locks cannot be made from Ti as it is too soft a metal to hold up. Frame locks can get away with it as it is a much thicker piece of CNC milled metal, compared to a thin stamped sheet. They also commonly will add a small piece of hardened steel to the end of the frame for added wear resistance.
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Nov 5, 2019
ecoleman
678
Nov 5, 2019
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There are two versions of the Dogtooth, a frame lock and a liner lock.
Nov 5, 2019
Kavik
4583
Nov 5, 2019
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Eh, it's all just semantics and ultimately doesn't really matter as long as whatever is used as a lockbar is thick enough to do its job. I'd look at this knife and say it is a liner lock, because the stainless "liner" is thinner than the "scales". Also, the "liners" are fully covered when looking at the face of the handle. Additionally, I'm betting you put it all together and all screws go on from the outside. In other words, you can't assemble and use this without the handle material in place. This, IMO, would be the most important distinction. Whereas the Gent, i would agree, is a frame lock with exterior scales. The G10 is thinner than the metal. It doesn't add any rigidity to the structure. The G10 doesn't fully cover the face of the handle. Most importantly, the knife is functional with the scales removed. You assemble the frame and have a perfectly functional knife, then add scales for looks/comfort (or call it a hybrid, if you want to be picky about the scales being integral to the locking system as an overtravel stop) The 2 key things, imo, are: 1) can the knife be assembled and used without the scales (then framelock with scales) 2) or are the scales required for the structure/rigidity of the handle (then linerlock) Again though, is it worth worrying about? I mean, "a rose by any other name...", right?
Nov 5, 2019
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