Topping DX7s Balanced DAC/Amp
Topping DX7s Balanced DAC/Amp
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Product Description
It’s not often that a fully balanced DAC/amp comes along at a price like this. The Topping DX7s improves upon the well-regarded DX7 by taking both the DAC and headphone amp sections up a notch Read More
Fully Balanced DAC/Amp With Notable Improvements

It’s not often that a fully balanced DAC/amp comes along at a price like this. The Topping DX7s improves upon the well-regarded DX7 by taking both the DAC and headphone amp sections up a notch. It features two ES9038 DAC chips and a more powerful amplifier—especially the four-pin balanced out, which is rated at 1,000 mW x 2 at 32 ohms and 546 mW x 2 at 300 ohms (compared to the original DX7, which outputted 420 mW at 300 ohms). Equipped with two XLR outputs, a coaxial input and output, and a USB input, the DX7s can be paired with a computer or used as the center of an audio setup. It can run either 110V or 220V, has a power mode switch on the left side, and is complete with an OLED display.

Note: This run is limited the Topping DX7s in black.

Color Options
Specs

Support

  • USB in: 44.1–6768 kHz/16–32 bit, DSD64–DSD256 (DoP), DSD64–DSD512 (native)
  • Opt/AES/coax in: 44.1–192 kHz/16–24 bit, DSD64 (DoP)
  • Coax out: 44.1–192 kHz/16–24 bit

Headphone Out, 6.35mm

  • THD+N, A-weighted: <0.005% at 1 kHz, 345 mW (32 ohms); <0.007% at 20–20 kHz, 345 mW (32 ohms); <0.0008% at 1 kHz, 78 mW (300 ohms); <0.0008% at 20–20 kHz, 78 mW (300 ohms)
  • SNR, A-weighted: >121 dB at 1 kHz
  • Frequency response: 20 Hz–20 kHz (+/- 0.35 dB)
  • Output level: 13.3 Vpp at 32 ohms, 18.7 Vpp at 300 ohms
  • Noise: <5.2 uVrms
  • Crosstalk: -124 dB at 1 kHz
  • Channel balance: 0.3 dB
  • Output impedance: <10 ohms
  • Output power: 690 mW x 2 at 32 ohms, THD+N <1%; 146 mW x 2 at 300 ohms, THD+N <1%
  • Drive ability: 16–300 ohms

Headphone Out, Balanced

  • THD+N, A-weighted: <0.002% at 1 kHz, 515 mW (32 ohms); <0.003% at 20–20 kHz, 515 mW (32 ohms); <0.0006% at 1 kHz, 273 mW (300 ohms); <0.0008% at 20–20 kHz, 273 mW (300 ohms)
  • SNR, A-weighted: >120 dB at 1 kHz
  • Frequency response: 20 Hz–20 kHz (+/- 0.12 dB)
  • Output level: 16.2 Vpp at 32 ohms, 36.2 Vpp at 300 ohms
  • Noise: <8.8 uVrms
  • Crosstalk: -129 dB at 1 kHz
  • Channel balance: 0.3 dB
  • Output impedance: <20 ohms
  • Output power: 1,000 mW x 2 at 32 ohms, THD+N <1%; 546 mW x 2 at 300 ohms, THD+N <1%
  • Drive ability: 32–600 ohms

Line Out / Coax Input, RCA

  • THD+N, A-weighted: <0.0005% at 1 kHz, <0.0006% at 20–20 kHz
  • SNR, A-weighted: >122 dB at 1 kHz
  • Frequency response: 20 Hz–20 kHz (+/- 0.35 dB)
  • Output level: 2 Vrms at 0 dBFS
  • Noise: <1.7 uVrms
  • Crosstalk: -127 dB at 1 kHz
  • Channel balance: 0.3 dB
  • Output impedance: 100 ohms
  • Line Out / Coax Input, XLR
  • THD+N, A-weighted: <0.0005% at 1 kHz, <0.0006% at 20–20 kHz
  • SNR, A-weighted: >123 dB at 1 kHz
  • Frequency response: 20 Hz–20 kHz (+/- 0.35 dB)
  • Output level: 4 Vrms at 0 dBFS
  • Noise: <2.6 uVrms
  • Crosstalk: -133 dB at 1 kHz
  • Channel balance: 0.3 dB
  • Output impedance: 200 ohms

Physical

  • Input: USB, opt, AES, coax
  • Digital input: Coax
  • Line out: XLR, RCA
  • Headphone out: 6.35 mm, balanced
  • Power input: AC110/AC220, 50 Hz/60 Hz
  • Dimensions: 9.8 x 8.1 x 2 in (25 x 20.5 x 5 cm)
  • Weight: 4.3 lbs (1.95 kg)
Included
  • ¼ in (6.35 mm) to ⅛ in (3.5 mm) adapter
  • USB data cable
  • AC power cord
  • Product manual
Shipping

All orders will be shipped by Drop.

Estimated ship date is Dec 10, 2020 PT.

Your payment method will be charged at checkout. Cancellations are accepted up to 2 hours after checkout, after which the request will be submitted to vendors to deliver the best delivery time to members, making all sales final. Be sure to check the discussion page for updates.

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Recent Activity
Glad you got a device with a mic input (because this doesn’t). The HD 6XX is indeed an HD 650 with a shorter cable, dark navy enclosure, at a lower price point than normal. Compared to neutral or the HD 600, the HD 650 was specifically designed with a bit less treble (like, very high notes, vocals are unaffected) so that the listener (presumably a studio mixing technician/producer) could listen for 8 hours or so without listening fatigue, and still get great info for mixing. Since it’s a very articulate driver, it should benefit more from every DAC/amp upgrade (like this Topping vs a motherboard or laptop built-in components). The HD 58X Jubilee is not based on the HD 660S... it has a smaller, less articulate, less tightly matched pair of driver, with a different Sonic profile/tuning, though it does happen to have the same output impedance and a similar looking enclosure. Though it’s performance is below the HD 660S and HD 6XX, it is still a very high performer at the $180 price point, with a bit more of an “audiophile tuning” than something like an HD 599. The HD 58X has more midbass than any of the other HD 6-series headphones, and more treble than the HD 6xx, so as a crowd pleaser it sounds a bit more lively and dynamic. With its 150 Ω impedance compared to the HD 6XX’s 300 Ω impedance (and about equal sensitivity, most people don’t realize sensitivity is just as important), the HD 58X Jubilee is a bit easier to drive from various sources with weaker amps. Considering that you’re on the Topping DX7s page, you probably have heard from spec-sheet reviewers that the amp section of the DX7s has plenty of power for either headphone, which is certainly true. I would agree that “both are such great headphones” 😁 Based on the tuning, the HD 6XX would probably be nicer for monitoring podcast recordings and be well-rounded for listening to all music genres (they’ve been enjoyed for almost two decades for a reason, and still today have some of the best dynamic drivers physics allows), but be aware that some of the “air” at the upper end of the frequency spectrum (do you know the difference between fundamental notes and harmonics? These highs are mostly harmonics) is “relaxed” a bit and less energetic. If you’re coming from a more typical consumer headphone, though, you might prefer the modestly boosted bass and more lively treble of the HD 58X Jubilee. I have all four of the headphones mentioned, feel free to ask questions or suggest music for impressions 😃. I don’t think there’s a “wrong” choice between the two you mentioned 👍🏻